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*Build & Price Your C8 with Spreadsheet:https://www.midenginecorvetteforum.c...-msrp-incl-dfc
*GM’s C8 Site: https://www.chevrolet.com/upcoming-v...ation-corvette
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Do NOT Compromise On Your Chosen Color Or Your Chosen Options

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  • Do NOT Compromise On Your Chosen Color Or Your Chosen Options

    Unknown Delivery Factors Effecting All Of Us Earlier C8 Recipients:

    So you got smart and lucky, and you dodged constraints, went to a dealer that go you a first month allocation, and that dealer selected your order to match with it for that first consensus, and further that your color choice and option choices were not constrained. Let’s call you Customer “A.” And in this hypothetical but realistic recounting of what could well happen again for the C8, Customer A had many, many friends who too were very lucky and got their orders made in the first few week or two of production.

    Meanwhile I (“customer B”) who had my deposit down with a top dealer for over 4 years, chose to get mine in Long Beach Red (or Elkhart Lake Blue) , and so the earliest consensus that my order could go was a initial consensus starting in October. So I, Customer B, who also had many, many friends, thought we were not getting our cars as early as Customer A and his/her many friends.

    SURPRISE, for fast forward to the first deliveries roughly around February 1, 2020 could be mostly Customer B and his/her friends.

    How could that happen?

    Several things, some of which can work for you and some of which will definitely work against you.

    1. Unknowns of so many kinds/types:

    *GM rejecting all of a suppliers’ submitted specific part: This has happened in the past, for example effecting the delivery schedule of the 2006 Z06’s when GM rejected 100% of the first batch of polished wheels for “intermittent cloudiness.” This resulted in my own Z06 which normally would not have been made until month two of the production process, becoming the the very first C6 Z06 NCM Museum Delivery. What at the last minute, the supplier to critical Mag Ride parts can not meet the BGA quality standards, and GM substitutes other parts, or moves up other carryover colors?

    *Supplier issues: Such as a Plant malfunction due to a fire (which has happened before during the C7 generation) that plant making just the part you need for your car, but when the plant resumed production two weeks later and got caught up on those parts quickly, might choosing your second or third choice color just to get into the first month’s of allocation been a smart decision?

    * GM finding some issues with quality control and due to the amount of vehicles needed that issue fixed before shipping, those cars actually arrived in customer hands later (even though they were the first C7’s made. This is exactly what happened to the earliest of C7’s made. In fact, most of the earliest ones were shipped to an offsite location for repair — which resulted in more than a few later produced C7’s getting into customers’ hand earlier than the first ones.

    *BGA’s traditional two week Christmas/New Year’s vacation: What if your car was scheduled to be completed the day before the vacation were to start, but initial C8 production was slowed down from theoretical just 2%, resulting in your car and others not being completed before the vacation started, and instead your C8 and others being sentenced to a two week hibernation in the middle of the Trim # 1 line. And guess whose cars might be less than a couple of hours, maybe even less the 100’ feet behind yours, the first of the next batch of painted ones.

    *Your C8 was selected for a supplemental Quality Control (QC) audit (something highly desirable IMO). While this usually means a delay of two days, some have during that audit review been found to have an issue that takes a moderate amount of time to fix.

    2. BGA Quality Control Hold (QCH):

    Whenever a new generation starts, in order to insure that there are no quality issues found within the first month, GM batch holds those initial cars on BGA grounds. While none of us nor GM yet knows the length of the C8’s initial QCH, most speculate it would be a month long. Could be longer. Could be less.

    What happens to those cars? After they are assembled, they are placed parked outside for the remaining of the QC hold. For the C7, around 1,500 of the first produced ones were placed into the hold area. Might your early produced C8 be “trapped” by other, later-produced cars around yours — just as many earlier C7’s were.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	55CA1110-04A3-49A4-839E-117167B14BBD.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	93.1 KB ID:	58091

    3. Transport process:

    Please ask yourself, that once the hold is over, are there enough transport trucks to take them out the gate the same day? Not even close, so what if your car was made day one and it was parked, then as the next few weeks went buy, more and more C7’s were parked completely around yours. Look at the closest yellow C7 in the above picture, then the second one behind it. What if your C7, made during week one, was one so far back in this picture, that you can not even see it (BTW what happened to mine).

    GM batch ships 11 C8’s per Jack Cooper Transport. They are not going to send a transporter with only eight of them. Let us imagine you live rural, Texas (or anywhere other than in a highly populated area). GM has six C8’s rearing to go to your home county, but no others, but where you live is not on the path to another location where they could unload some here, some there, along the way. So those eight sit, waiting to be joining be 3 others going to your same area.

    All the above collectively means that a prudent person will order the exact color and options that they want, not compromising based on what is currently know today — for as the above limited examples show, what we think we know today can change (confirmed by both C6 and C7 history). Even GM can not now predict when you car will be made when, nor shipped when, and as history has shown, often constraints are predicted for a specific time period, such as four weeks, but it turns out to be three weeks or even just two weeks.


    Please, please, please do not decide to now give up on your chosen color nor an option because it seems today to be a little production schedule constrained! If you do, and say your second choice color car arrives at your house on Feb 1st, but then you go to a Cars-and-Coffee just a week or two later to see a C8 in the color you really wanted right there looking even more spectacular than yours...















    Lifetime, annual contributors, and 20+ year members of NCM.

  • #2
    Thanks John for posting this.....

    Comment


    • #3
      Your insight and suggestion makes a lot of sense. Id never change the color of my new car to get it a little sooner especially if there is a possibility it could end up arriving at the same time..

      in the scheme of life a few short days or weeks or even months means very little...

      buying a brand new generation doesnt always mean that getting the first ones built is like winning a race in first place

      .sure its easy to get excited and wrapped up in the idea that sooner rather than later youll be driving your new awesome c8 but in reality...a little time delay could be a good thing.

      im not changing my order because I might have to wait a little longer. I made my choices logically and soundly..ill wait my turn besides who knows it might be the beginning of spring or summer...and thats a good thing...

      i was originally very hesitant to even buy a first year car because after the first year little corrections are made on the production line to improve the vehicle.

      honestly I dont even need this new corvette...im just buying one because its so dam cool.

      if I dont get to drive the c8 home four states in a winter blizzard...Im ok with that...

      whatever ends up happening...it will be good.because at the end of the waiting that c8 will be yours to own and drive.

      Torch Red exterior/ black interior z51 FE4 1LT VK3 GKZ HTA

      Comment


      • #4
        As I wrote in another thread today: If I have to wait a few extra months to get what I want, it won't kill me. If I settle for something else to get it sooner, I will probably regret not getting what I really wanted for as long as I own the car.
        SunKissed, my 2015 2LT, 7MT, Black over Daytona Sunrise Orange Metallic, Stingray convertible (One of about 40)

        Purchased 5/2/2015,
        >33,000+ miles

        Proud member of the Old Dominion Corvette Club. Check us out http://www.olddominioncorvetteclub.org

        Comment


        • #5
          There is one related factor and this relates to GM smartly and deliberately having a very slow ramp up at the beginning of every new generation. That is a concept all of us are very familiar with, e.g., “muscle memory.” I worked at an OEM assembly plant on the primary assembly line. As I was a summer fill in employee, I was assigned to a new station every Monday or every other one. I would not be truthful if I said that I was as skilled at the beginning of a new job as I was at the end; even at the end of two week assignments, I knew I was not at the skill level as I would have been had I had more time at my station. Of course, I was not trained, practiced, tested and “job mastery level four certified” as all all BGA employees are before they touch a single customer car.

          Nevertheless, might the skill level of an BGA employee be better during month two or three than they were at week two?
          Lifetime, annual contributors, and 20+ year members of NCM.

          Comment


          • #6
            The way i see it...if its 3 months from february for those of us in the northeast..thats fine...february, march april are crappy weather months anyway..

            with the upcoming spring and summer months its always more fun to get a new car...

            rainy snowy months with a new car is never as much fun as sunshine and roof off motoring...

            ive taken delivery around christmas time...and thats fun too...but spring summer deliveries are especially noteworthy for your soul and for even greater enjoyment.

            when life gives you lemons...make lemonade.

            Admit it..many of you guys who have two cars for their own use would probably store the c8 for most of the winter weather anyway.
            Last edited by JB; 08-11-2019, 08:11 AM.
            Torch Red exterior/ black interior z51 FE4 1LT VK3 GKZ HTA

            Comment


            • #7
              Very enlightening

              Comment


              • #8
                Not changing anything on my order, even if it is delayed a bit. It will get here when it gets here. I think I can find something else to drive while I'm waiting. I agree, the skill level of line workers may improve, so a car delivered a couple of months later might not be such a bad thing.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks Jag for finding this Aug 11, 2013 picture. It shows that building a new Corvette generation is a very slow process at the beginning. Here, for example are all of the customer built C7’s on that date. When we compare this to the above picture and note that 1,500 were completed and starting to be shipped about one month after this picture was taken, one can visually imagine that when they start building a new gen, they initially build only 1 per hour, then two per hour, then more and more.

                  We do not know when the first customer C7 was completed, but believe it was sometime in early July, 2013.


                  Click image for larger version  Name:	E209E473-0E54-4CAB-89F1-A1E6A41D1359.png Views:	1 Size:	839.2 KB ID:	58220
                  Last edited by John; 08-11-2019, 09:23 AM.
                  Lifetime, annual contributors, and 20+ year members of NCM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sure are a lot of nice yellow Vettes in that picture. Sigh.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have a question on transportation. This will be the second GM car I have ordered. The first was a Saturn Sky in 2007. The plant in Delaware shipped it to Lordstown Ohio where it sat for a number of days until GM put it on a train to Los Angeles, CA. Apparently, Lordstown was a major facility where cars where sorted from all over the east coast for distribution to the rest of the country. My question is this; does anyone know what GM is doing for long distance distribution to the west coast now that Lordstown is being sold? Do they have a new distribution facility to replace Lordstown and will the C8's use it?
                      Reserved C8 July 30, 2019
                      Current Corvette - 2017 GrandSport Coupe Long Beach Red
                      Preceded by 1999 Corvette Hardtop Black
                      Preceded by 1994 Corvette Polo Green Metallic

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Well said John thanks for taking the time. Faster is not always better... it's hard to wait, but good things come to those who wait...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by RSVette View Post
                          I have a question on transportation. This will be the second GM car I have ordered. The first was a Saturn Sky in 2007. The plant in Delaware shipped it to Lordstown Ohio where it sat for a number of days until GM put it on a train to Los Angeles, CA. Apparently, Lordstown was a major facility where cars where sorted from all over the east coast for distribution to the rest of the country. My question is this; does anyone know what GM is doing for long distance distribution to the west coast now that Lordstown is being sold? Do they have a new distribution facility to replace Lordstown and will the C8's use it?
                          For all Corvette those that go by train, are all transported by Jack Cooper Transport to CSX’s massive rail-yard in Toledo, OH. Those that go directly by JCT to the dealership, the lucky ones, have a shorter delivery time for sure. For the early C7’s, it took as much as six weeks from BG to the Pacific Northwest. Thankfully by about the C7’s year three, that travel time was consistently four weeks, with an occasional three weeks to the West Coast.
                          Last edited by John; 08-11-2019, 12:59 PM.
                          Lifetime, annual contributors, and 20+ year members of NCM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yeah i found it crazy how many people I've read were immediately going to change their color just to get it earlier (if that even did play out) ... I'm sticking to my color...Regardless I will say the BIGGEST thing that would cause me to change my order entirely will be released on Aug 15th

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I know I read earlier, but can't locate now. How many are produced first week, second week, and then third week of production?

                              Comment

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