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CORVETTE TODAY #115 - Corvette News & Headlines, Late June 2022

We've got the latest News & Headlines in the world of Corvette for you every other week! Keith Cornett from CorvetteBlogger is back to give you the inside scoop on what's happening. https://youtu.be/ZnVdDJHYDxo; https://podcasts.adorilabs.com/corve...2cqLUlcMmj6m4x
Here are a few of the topics covered on next week's podcast....
C8 Z06 benchmarked Porsche, Audi, Ferrari and McLaren
Chevrolet raises prices on 2023 C8 Stingray
Chevrolet adds DCT transmission filter life to maintenance tab on 2023 Corvettes
Chevy offers "Dark Stealth" crossed flags for 2023 Corvettes
WEC drops GTE Pro class for 2023 and introduces GTE Premium for 2024
Chevrolet is offering Dark Stealth Crossed Flags for the 2023 Corvettes
Is Corvette is scheduled for an interior refresh in 2024?
Chevrolet to offer 1 of 1 Mint Green Z06 in first NFT Auction
GM releases 2 more videos about the C8 Z06
This Friday, July 1st, is "Drive Your Corvette To Work" Day!

Don't miss a single episode of CORVETTE TODAY on podcast and YouTube. Each week's episode launches on Monday at 12 midnight Eastern Time.
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2023 Corvette Info Including SR Pricing, SR 2023 Visualizer, 70th Anniversary SR/Z06 Press Release; The C8 Z06 Press Release, Order Guide & Its Visualizer Link

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What worries you about the Carbon Fiber wheels?

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  • What worries you about the Carbon Fiber wheels?

    We are all anxiously awaiting GM's pricing announcement of the Z06.

    I am fairly certain I will order the Z07 package that comes standard with Cup2Rs. I hope they will last 5k miles of average street driving. Afterwards, I will replace them with PS4s, which should last 2-3 times longer?

    However, I am on the fence regarding the CF wheels. I love the fact they will maximize handling response of the Z07 package, but unlikely I would notice the difference on the street even though they reduce unsprung weight by 41 pounds!

    The price point is a lesser concern, but if they cost <$12k I'm okay with that.

    My main concerns are fears of an incompetent tire installer damaging them during tire replacement and likely exorbitant Chevy parts counter price if a replacement is required if I accidentally curb one. The likelihood of me curbing a wheel is very low, but the thought of paying $7k or more for one wheel worries me.

    What are your concerns of getting the CF wheels?

  • #2
    Aside from cost and damage issues, finding anyone competent and willing to mount and dismount tires.

    You talk about reducing unspring weight by 41 pounds. Well, you can save about 1/2 that amount by replacing run flat tires with non run flats. And the weight saved by lighter tires is at the outside perimeter of the tire and wheel assembly, maximizing the beneficial effect of lower rotating mass. And non run flats are usually easier to mount and dismount.
    2022 HTC 2LT Z51
    Front lift, mag ride
    black exterior, adrenaline red interior, bright red calipers

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    • #3
      This is a two edged sword for me. One one hand we love the look of the visible carbon fiber wheels. On the other hand, despise Cup2R’s for our type of usage. And also as noted above, some concern about the ability for a tire changer to work on vis CF 13’ wide wheels (something they have NEVER done before for any brand).

      Decisions; decisions.
      Z06 coming late this summer: Hypersonic Gray HTC, two tone blue interior, complete high wing/aero package. CCB’s, with every piece of visible carbon fiber available. Lifetime, annual contributors, and 24 year members of National Corvette Museum. Home is the beautiful Pacific Northwest.

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      • #4
        Theft and whatever damage they may do to the car if they try or succeed.

        I had an issue previously with very expensive custom 3 piece 1 off wheels.
        Last edited by Frenzy36; 05-04-2022, 10:20 PM.
        Rocket City Florida- 2001 ZO6 - 2013 427 Vert - 2020 Stingray

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        • #5
          Can not reasonably daily drive them. They are Cars and Coffee. Drop a wheel at the track or anywhere else?

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          • #6
            Age and the effects of time on resin. For years and years I had a bunch of CF parts on my Ducatis and over time as the resin ages the CF and it took on a dull brownish hue, if you waxed it it would get most of the way back in appearance. The other thing is resins change with age, it's why you're not supposed to use a helmet that's over 5 years old, still looks fine, but may not perform as designed. The other thing is the shapes. We as humans look at metal wheels and say in our minds that's how a wheel is supposed to look, with spokes. When it's all the same material that's fine, but when you blend the spoke fiber into the rim fibers it's no longer continuous. I remember going to a motorcycle trade show and the CF wheel guy was bouncing a CF motorcycle wheel off the concrete like a ball. It looked impressive knowing you couldn't do that with a metal wheel (aluminum or magnesium). Problem with the demonstration was, it wasn't imparting the loads at the right place. When I saw a CF wheel failure and the spokes broke away from the rim on a bike that was tracking and it failed at speed, it was eye opening. Should they actually be smooth continuous wheels with no spokes? Don't know, may be strongest, but they wouldn't look good. It gets back to us trying to take a different material and "make" it look the the shape we've been using. They'll probably be OK, but the newest shiniest toy isn't always the best.

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            • #7
              Cost - but if they sell them for $10K, that is not too bad. Porsche set is $24K for a Turbo
              2022 2LT CHT - Red/Blk Z51
              Waiting list ZO6

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              • #8
                Well, they look okay. The unsprung wieght issue is the most important thing to think of. But I question their longevity, and possibly some slight street damage leading to a real safety issue that occurs at the worst time.

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                • #9
                  Too bad that there don't seem to be any magnesium wheel options for the C8...
                  My C8:
                  '20 Elkhart Lake Blue 2LT Coupe, Natural Interior, GT2 Two-Tone Seats, Performance Exhaust, Front Lift, Carbon Flash Wheels, Engine Appearance Package 2000 Status December 27, 2019; 3000 Status January 2, 2020; 3400 Status March 10, 2020;TPW March 16, 2020; Built June 4th, 2020 (COVID-19); Delivery July 1, 2020

                  Current Vettes:
                  '68 Lemans Blue 327/350 Convertible
                  '91 Turquoise Convertible with Hardtop
                  '14 Lime Rock Green 2LT Convertible, Black Top, Kalahari, 7-Speed, Performance Exhaust

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Phil1098 View Post
                    Age and the effects of time on resin. For years and years I had a bunch of CF parts on my Ducatis and over time as the resin ages the CF and it took on a dull brownish hue, if you waxed it it would get most of the way back in appearance. The other thing is resins change with age, it's why you're not supposed to use a helmet that's over 5 years old, still looks fine, but may not perform as designed. The other thing is the shapes. We as humans look at metal wheels and say in our minds that's how a wheel is supposed to look, with spokes. When it's all the same material that's fine, but when you blend the spoke fiber into the rim fibers it's no longer continuous. I remember going to a motorcycle trade show and the CF wheel guy was bouncing a CF motorcycle wheel off the concrete like a ball. It looked impressive knowing you couldn't do that with a metal wheel (aluminum or magnesium). Problem with the demonstration was, it wasn't imparting the loads at the right place. When I saw a CF wheel failure and the spokes broke away from the rim on a bike that was tracking and it failed at speed, it was eye opening. Should they actually be smooth continuous wheels with no spokes? Don't know, may be strongest, but they wouldn't look good. It gets back to us trying to take a different material and "make" it look the the shape we've been using. They'll probably be OK, but the newest shiniest toy isn't always the best.
                    Tadge said they use a very expensive additive in their exposed carbon fiber resins to reduce sun damage to the point where it meets all GM specifications for durability. He said it adds considerable cost to GMs carbon fiber parts.

                    Carbon fiber has been used in high performance production power boats for at least a decade and a half now.
                    Last edited by Michael; 05-07-2022, 10:52 PM.

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                    • #11
                      GM pioneered that UV protective resin for visible carbon fiber with the C6 ZR1. It costs $60,000/gallon.
                      Z06 coming late this summer: Hypersonic Gray HTC, two tone blue interior, complete high wing/aero package. CCB’s, with every piece of visible carbon fiber available. Lifetime, annual contributors, and 24 year members of National Corvette Museum. Home is the beautiful Pacific Northwest.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Interesting bit from the Owners Manual.

                        Z06 with Z07 Performance Package Equipped With Carbon Fiber Wheels (RPOs ROY and ROZ) When participating in Track Events or Competitive Driving with these wheels, a proper cool down without hot soaking the wheels is critical. . On a typical road course 3.2–6.5 km (2-4 miles) long per lap, one cool down lap without using the brakes will suffice. If the track being driven is shorter than 3.2 km (2 mi), perform two cool down laps without using the brakes. . If adequate cool down without using the brakes cannot be achieved (i.e., red flag on track, have to stop unexpectedly, etc.), the key is to not have one area of the wheels exposed to the "chimney effect" of the heat that rises off of a stationary hot brake rotor. This can be prevented by very low speed driving of the car such that the entire circumference of the wheel is exposed to the heat. Rolling the car back and forth in a small space is better than sitting still with hot brakes.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Chentecruz View Post
                          Interesting bit from the Owners Manual.

                          Z06 with Z07 Performance Package Equipped With Carbon Fiber Wheels (RPOs ROY and ROZ) When participating in Track Events or Competitive Driving with these wheels, a proper cool down without hot soaking the wheels is critical. . On a typical road course 3.2–6.5 km (2-4 miles) long per lap, one cool down lap without using the brakes will suffice. If the track being driven is shorter than 3.2 km (2 mi), perform two cool down laps without using the brakes. . If adequate cool down without using the brakes cannot be achieved (i.e., red flag on track, have to stop unexpectedly, etc.), the key is to not have one area of the wheels exposed to the "chimney effect" of the heat that rises off of a stationary hot brake rotor. This can be prevented by very low speed driving of the car such that the entire circumference of the wheel is exposed to the heat. Rolling the car back and forth in a small space is better than sitting still with hot brakes.
                          Hummmnnnn - With the price of CF Wheels they should be bulletproof and heatproof.
                          Rocket City Florida- 2001 ZO6 - 2013 427 Vert - 2020 Stingray

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Chentecruz View Post
                            Interesting bit from the Owners Manual.

                            Z06 with Z07 Performance Package Equipped With Carbon Fiber Wheels (RPOs ROY and ROZ) When participating in Track Events or Competitive Driving with these wheels, a proper cool down without hot soaking the wheels is critical. . On a typical road course 3.2–6.5 km (2-4 miles) long per lap, one cool down lap without using the brakes will suffice. If the track being driven is shorter than 3.2 km (2 mi), perform two cool down laps without using the brakes. . If adequate cool down without using the brakes cannot be achieved (i.e., red flag on track, have to stop unexpectedly, etc.), the key is to not have one area of the wheels exposed to the "chimney effect" of the heat that rises off of a stationary hot brake rotor. This can be prevented by very low speed driving of the car such that the entire circumference of the wheel is exposed to the heat. Rolling the car back and forth in a small space is better than sitting still with hot brakes.
                            So the next question is, how do you know if you got too much heat into your CF wheels? Does it not show until a week later when you pitch it into a corner and the resin fractures?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              All this reminds me of a 1970s Ducati V twin engine with desmo valve train. Cam followers both opened and closed overhead valves, precluding the need for powerful valve springs to avoid valve float. But to work, valve adjustment had to be very precise, and the recommended interval between adjustments was something like 400 miles, and it took several hours to complete.

                              Sometimes, the theoretically ideal clashes with practical reality. The CF wheels may be great for a Formula 1 team. But for a casual enthusiast?
                              2022 HTC 2LT Z51
                              Front lift, mag ride
                              black exterior, adrenaline red interior, bright red calipers

                              Comment

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