Adnimation ATF

Collapse

MECF_728x90_top

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
1 of 3 < >

CORVETTE TODAY #121 - Corvette News & Headlines, Mid August 2022

The world of Corvette is really heating up with the release of pricing for the C8 Z06. Your CORVETTE TODAY host, Steve Garrett and Keith Cornett from CorvetteBlogger are back with the most current Corvette news and headlines. https://youtu.be/QRAUz6Att0k; https://podcasts.adorilabs.com/corve...jnmYV0amyIoQR2
Here are a few of the topics discussed in this week’s show….
1.Chevrolet offering C8 Z06 buyers $5,000 in rewards for not “flipping” their car
2.GM limits the warranty transferability of the C8 Z06 to people who flip their cars
3.The C8 Z06 Order Guide is now available for download
4.FBI raids a Chinese-owned company that makes aluminum wheels for GM
5.Spring Mountain is back open after a flash flood covered the track with sand & debris
6.Our "Corvette Insider" Manny Katakis is back with insider information!
7.Lingenfelter introduces high performance CAI for the C8
8.The first 35th Anniversary Callaway C8 arrives at Ciocca Chevrolet
2 of 3 < >

Find out your C8’s Order Status by asking!

Information provided to MidEngineCorvetteForum members, and with great thanks to Corvette Ed for answering your inquiry requests in our sticky’d “The C8 Order Inquiry Status Thread” in our “Purchasing Section.”https://www.midenginecorvetteforum.c...inquiry-thread
3 of 3 < >

2023 Corvette Info Including SR Pricing, SR 2023 Visualizer, 70th Anniversary SR/Z06 Press Release; The C8 Z06 Press Release, Order Guide & Its Visualizer Link

See more
See less

Magnetic Ride Control .. Do I need this?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • meyerweb
    replied
    Unless the price puts it out of reach, I think MSRC is a great option on both the Z51 and the base model. In fact, unless you plan to track the Z51, I think it's more valuable on the base, at least for my driving style. I think the Z51 rides fine, even without MSRC. But I find the Tour suspension setting on my base (which I think is pretty close to the FE1 base suspension) to be softer than I like except for really bad roads or highway driving. For daily driving and spirited runs on back roads, I much prefer the Sport setting. I think that if I had the base car without MSRC, I'd be looking for stiffer sway bars, like I did on my base C7.

    And MSRC is more than just being able to set the suspension softer or firmer. The system's ability to respond to road imperfections, cornering forces, and braking by varying the damping up to 10 times per second, on each corner individually, really makes a difference in driving on bad roads and in spirited driving on any roads. On the smooth track at NCM, there was noticeably less body roll in track than I encounter in Sport on the street. On the street, there's less nose dive under braking in Sport or Track. And unlike the C7, Track mode (at least with FE2) isn't so stiff you need to avoid it on the street.

    In the end, it comes down to what you want from the car, your driving style, and probably what you're comparing the C8 to. If you're coming from a Lexus, the base FE1 suspension will feel very sporty. If you're coming from a Porsche GT3, anything other than the Z51 in Track mode might feel soft. For the C8, if you want the softest highway cruiser possible, then the base car without MSRC is probably just fine, although the MSRC will still handle bad roads better due to it's 10 times per second real time adjustments. If you want a sporty, firmer ride on the street, the Z51 without MSRC is probably just fine, although the MSRC will let you make it even sportier and handle rough roads better. But if you want the best of both worlds, MSRC on either car gives you a much wider range of driving pleasure.

    My base FE2 will soak up most of the bumps on the worst roads around here (and some are pretty bad) in Tour mode without feeling at all floaty, and handle the most aggressive driving I'm willing to do on the street just fine in Track mode. And Sport mode is the perfect compromise for daily driving for me. YMMV.
    Last edited by meyerweb; 09-27-2021, 09:38 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • UCF.Fan48
    replied
    Originally posted by Milliwatt Rob View Post
    Living in Vermont with road surfaces ranging from unpaved graded gravel to badly patched asphalt, to newly repaved smooth surfaces, I would not be without it. I believe that these features add to the resale value of the car as well.

    However, I would note that the C8 suspension, particularly the rear suspension, is changed from any prior Corvette suspension. It is now fully independent coil over shock, instead of the prior transverse rear leaf spring. So nobody has any practical experience with magnetic ride on the C8 suspension system. Indeed, nobody can tell you what the ride quality will be on the C8 without the magnetic ride either.

    Another reason why I intend to buy no earlier than the second model year, when I will have the benefit of feedback from the early adapters.
    Bingo! If your going Z51 I believe Mag Ride is a good investment to make. So accessorize, accessorize, accessorize! This car is a bargain @ MSRP + $15 to $20K IMO….

    Leave a comment:


  • netsinah
    replied
    Whether you purchase the MRC, IMO, comes down to preference and financial capability/priorities. I don't have it with my 2020 C8: it wasn't available since I ordered it w/o the Z51 package and won't ever track the car (knowing the Z06 was coming) and I'm ++ enjoying the ride w/o it, typically using Sport Mode 90% of the time and Tour Mode when my spouse is my passenger. But admittedly I've not experienced the MRC first-hand. The big question is how different the C8 ride is with MRC...since very few people have owned both versions. From another Corvette Forum I frequent, one individual recently posted this (with credit to "CamsC8"):

    ​​​​​​I've owned a 2020 Z51 C8 coupe without mag ride and now my 21 HTC mag ride C8 and there's a difference.

    As stated above the mag ride takes the bumps alot nicer than not. In track mode the car stiffens up quite a bit too.

    I feel it's worth the money especially on a non-Z51 car.


    I invite anyone on this Forum who has owned a C8 with and w/o MRC, to provide their opinion. It would be nice to hear from those "in the know" who've put some miles on their C8's and can provide that direct comparison.

    Leave a comment:


  • TireEater
    replied
    I didn't want spoilers so I don't have it on my 2020 which rides and handles great without it. That said I would order it as a stand alone option after having it in my CTS-V.

    Leave a comment:


  • JB
    replied
    Originally posted by rrigia View Post
    I have been driving my C8 since March 2020 and have almost 20,00 miles .It is my daily driver. Living in Montgomery County Texas the roads are pretty smooth. So, for me the standard suspension is more than adequate. Quite smooth to be honest.
    You are correct..lthe standard suspension is excellent as well. Up here in the northeast the winters can and probably do tear up the roadways more so than in your area.


    mrc is definitely not a requirement yet I will say it sure does come in handy on those early morning drives on local roads here.

    enjoy and thanks for sharing,

    Leave a comment:


  • rrigia
    replied
    I have been driving my C8 since March 2020 and have almost 20,00 miles .It is my daily driver. Living in Montgomery County Texas the roads are pretty smooth. So, for me the standard suspension is more than adequate. Quite smooth to be honest.

    Leave a comment:


  • John
    replied
    Thanks RKCRLR. Good info within that article.

    Leave a comment:


  • RKCRLR
    replied
    Just in case anyone hasn't seen this article:

    Some good GM videos part of the original MC&T following article:





    Originally posted by MuscleCars&Trucks
    C8 CORVETTE SUSPENSION: THE SECRETS BEHIND MAGNETIC RIDE CONTROL 4.0

    We Interview The MagnaRide Master To Understand How The Corvette Handles So Well


    by Manoli KatakisAugust 2, 2021, 4:02 pm

    Image Via GM.
    MC&T recently spent time with a 2021 Corvette Stingray of a very particular spec: a hardtop convertible with the FE2 suspension package. This Elkhart Lake Bluedrop-top did not feature the Z51 package, and as such came with Michelin Pilot Sport 4S three-season tires, and a magnetic ride control suspension tune that made it optimal for grand touring. Those long, comfortable road trips at high speed. Not exactly the first thing that comes to mind when thinking about a mid-engined sports car, if we’re honest. However, our time with this C8 Corvette was exactly that, so we decided to take a closer look at the suspension system, highlighted by the latest magnetic ride control dampers, dubbed MR 4.0.

    Talking us through the C8 Corvette suspension system was Michael Hurley, a General Motors vehicle dynamics engineer that specializes in controlled suspension development. The MagnaRide Master.

    2021 Corvette Stingray FE2 Suspension Package: The Background

    Despite the cushy nature of the 2021 Corvette FE2 suspension package, the setup has roots in the FE4 package found in the C8 Z51 Stingray.

    “The FE2 package benefited from the learnings of the FE4 package,” said Hurley. “We took the FE1 package – the most relaxed suspension with the all season tire – and added MR to it… these cars also benefited from MR 4.0.”

    Compared to previous magnetic ride control dampers, MR 4.0 is a revolution, and completely changes how the Corvette and other General Motors vehicles utilize the adaptive suspension technology.

    “There are two main things that happened,” Hurley begins to explain. “One is that we went away from position sensors at each corner calculating roll and pitch, to an actual accelerometer at each corner.”

    The result is more accuracy, and therefore more exact control for suspension calibration.

    “There’s a lot more fidelity there, a lot more precision,” said Hurley. “You’re getting rid of the linkage and the mechanical bits that are involved in a position sensor. You’ve got a much better signal to work with at each corner to start with.”

    Another layer to the precision of MR 4.0 found in the 2021 Corvette Stingray is what’s described as an IMU – or an inertial motion unit – that measures true heave/roll/pitch signals, versus calculated ones.

    “The calculations were fine but there’s definitely times where the better the signal is coming in, the better you can tune (the suspension),” explained Hurley. “This all happens within the MR controller itself. It has all sorts of inputs from everything else going on in the vehicle. But the actual computing power of MR has its own controller that runs it.”

    MR 4.0 Suspension: Incredible Precision And Versatility

    The benefit to this approach is a greater bandwidth for suspension tuning as well, and not only improved precision.

    “Having true accelerometers, having true heave/roll/pitch signals rather than a calculation… you could tune more straightforward,” the GM suspension engineer said. “Especially really low velocity things. When you’re relying on a position system and it has a little lash in the system, and you couldn’t really trust the signal at a tight tolerance. Now the signals are real, and you can trust them, and tune them to a fidelity that you just couldn’t before.”

    The 2020 Corvette Stingray was the first vehicle from General Motors with fourth-generation Magnetic Ride Control, but the Cadillac CT4 and CT5 also have MR 4.0– highlighted by the Blackwing performance cars. Hurley also noted that any new GM application here on out will have MR 4.0, as well. Which will only mean better handling cars, trucks and SUVs from here on out.

    However, suspension isn’t the only subcomponent of the 2021 Corvette Stingray that makes it handle so well. It’s the tires, too.

    “(The tire) is part of the reason the FE2 package is as good of a GT car as it is,” mentioned Hurley. “The all-season tire brings with it a level of rolling isolation that you’re just not going to get out of a summer only tire. You start from there, and tune with that.”

    From the tire, next comes what damper setup that engineers think would have the best application.

    Magnetic Ride Control Part Of A “Library” Of Suspension Solutions

    First step for us was to pick the damper. There’s a library of what we call ‘gaps and bypass.’ And that brings with it a family of damping curves… so you end up with this window of available curves through a velocity range.

    Though, at some point, physics will take over.

    The trick is that if you go less damping than what you get with FE2, that’s about as relaxed as I can make the car before it just gets shaky and unintegrated. So in order to keep things clean and integrated, there’s a minimum amount of damping that has to be there… you can do it and make it shake like a 70s Buick, but nobody wants that.

    Magnetic Ride Control, unlike other fixed solutions such as the Multimatic DSSV dampers, also deliver incredible control at high speeds and cornering forces, and that’s what makes it a perfect solution for the C8 Corvette and the variety of uses seen from customers.

    “There’s so much tuning availability with MR. All of the rebound/compression ratios through all of these velocity ranges are all tunable… that’s where you get the rolling plushness that really jumps out in the FE2 Corvette,” said Hurley. “I think that’s why there are so many variants of Corvettes, because people come in with a different set of priorities and desires.”
    The 2022 Corvette Stingray, launching this fall, will continue to offer the FE2 and FE4 magnetic ride suspension systems, as the Chevrolet Performance family readies for the arrival of the 2023 Corvette Z06. The flat-plane crank V8-powered supercar is expected to be the most track-capable C8 Corvette yet, and is likely to rely in part on MR 4.0 to get make it all possible

    https://www.musclecarsandtrucks.com/...ley-interview/

    Leave a comment:


  • RLBZ06
    replied
    I agree that MRC is a tremendous feature. It helps turn the track beast in to a friendly grand touring ride and everything in between. Not a must but really glad I have it (just finished a 6800 mile road trip and it makes a real difference).

    Leave a comment:


  • JB
    replied
    No you dont need mrc yet it is among my personal favorite technical features on the c8 corvette as my daily driver.

    fabulous and amazing technology in my opinion.

    really amazing technology. My fourth new corvette. The mrc shocks are a first for me and Im impressed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Buzzsaw
    replied
    Originally posted by Davii1775 View Post

    Get the MRC, it's a big deal.
    Sir, Yes Sir !!😉

    Leave a comment:


  • Davii1775
    replied
    Originally posted by Buzzsaw View Post
    SO, in two years, You are ready to sell your C8 and float off into the sunset in your big Caddy. What will potential buyers preferer/WANT ????

    MCR, no MRC?

    car will have Z51 package
    Get the MRC, it's a big deal.

    Leave a comment:


  • Buzzsaw
    replied
    SO, in two years, You are ready to sell your C8 and float off into the sunset in your big Caddy. What will potential buyers preferer/WANT ????

    MCR, no MRC?

    car will have Z51 package

    Leave a comment:


  • WWR
    replied
    I have it on my '15 Z51 and until I had the second flush a few days ago I didn't realize how good my car drives. Admittedly it has needed that procedure done for awhile and I was convinced it was the Z51,Run Flats, and a Corvette. I will definitely get another Z51. I won't track it though. It's like having 300 tv channels I don't watch them all but I have them "just in case"

    Leave a comment:


  • LightningBolt
    replied
    I don’t need MRC for 99% of my driving, but I don’t *need* a sports car either.

    Leave a comment:

MECF_728x90_bottom

Collapse
Working...
X