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Lowering the C8

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  • Lowering the C8

    Question for those of you who have lowered your vehicles: Doe sit affect the warranty? How much doe sit typically cost?

  • #2
    I've lowered both C7s I've owned. a Stingray and a ZO6. No cost involved for me, just some time in the garage with a good hydraulic jack and jackstand as well as a wrench. This is lowering the car on the stock bolts and as far as I know does not affect the warranty in any way. An adjustment, not a modification. As far as the C8 goes the procedure will be different as the car has different springs but I wouldn't think it would be all that difficult or affect the warranty.

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    • #3
      Thanks. I don't have car mechanic skills so I would have to pay someone to do it. I'm not sure if 'm even going to do it.

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      • #4
        If your Tech uses two spanners, he/she can easily lower your C8 somewhat. That would not effect your warranty. However, an alignment would be important to do afterwards.

        If your C8 has both the lift option and the Z51 option, you lose the ability to adjust the front end easily. Of course, shorter aftermarket springs could be used to do so, but going this route could well effect your warranty.

        I like the idea of getting your car, driving it 500 to 1,000 miles, letting the suspension settle naturally, and then deciding whether you wish to lower it at all, or if so by what means.
        GBA Black; HTO Twilight/Tension interior; Z51 & Mag Ride; E60 lift; 5ZZ high wing; 5VM vis CF ground effects pkg; FA5 interior vis CF; ZZ3 engine appearance; 3LT; Q8T Spectra Gray Tridents; J6N Edge Red Calipers; SNG Edge Red Hashmarks; VQK Splash Guards. Separately getting from my dealer RCC Edge Red engine cover and 5JR vis CF mirror caps.

        Lifetime, annual contributors, and 20+ year members of National Corvette Museum.

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        • #5
          Thanks. I knew the lift option would not allow lowering but I didn't know the Z51 option was an issue too. I have a long ways to go. I don't expect my car to arrive until April or May. Thanks again.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Hebstar11 View Post
            Thanks. I knew the lift option would not allow lowering but I didn't know the Z51 option was an issue too. I have a long ways to go. I don't expect my car to arrive until April or May. Thanks again.
            Just to clarify, the Z51 doesn't preclude adjusting the height. In fact, only the Z51 allows height adjustment. But as you know, with the lift you can only adjust the rear, not the front.

            I would guess adjust the ride height at the rear wouldn't take a mechanic more than about an hour, followed by the cost of an alignment. But lowering the rear without being able to lower the front to match might result in an odd appearance.
            SunKissed, my 2015 2LT, 7MT, Black over Daytona Sunrise Orange Metallic, Stingray convertible (One of about 40)

            Purchased 5/2/2015,
            >35,000+ miles

            Proud member of the Old Dominion Corvette Club. Check us out http://www.olddominioncorvetteclub.org

            Never grow up - It's a trap.

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            • #7
              careful, lowering the car might change values that could cause handling problems. not only will your toe and chamber change, but a less talked about and understood, Caster will also be effected. Plus , your corners weights will be effected. I know guys slam their car so it looks cool, but they might not understand that to do this correctly, they need to know and understand what they are doing. its not just about fender gaps. [ fenders are thin and bolted to the frame with consideration to panel gaps and have no accurate alignment to the frame]. Yes I know, on the street, slammed cars are cool.

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              • #8
                If you lower your C8 , let’s say an inch at all four corners that would NOT Affect corner weight

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                • #9
                  If lowering the car so the car tracks down a road correctly when suspension is loaded and unloads
                  & that all 4 corners each have a different weight then any lowering really has to look
                  at the designed valving GM did for the C8's marriage of shocks, Coil-overs, size of sway bars, MRC and if having the ELSD rear end
                  If doing nothing but lowering the car then expect less shock travel to less then what the valving design was set for.

                  Since shocks move gas or fluid around inside at certain rates to provide damping, it stands to reason that the faster the medium moves in the shock, the quicker the shock will compress or extend.
                  Usually the compression & extension rates are very different.

                  The reason is simple.
                  When traveling down a road & encountering a bump, you’d like the wheel to deflect as quickly as possible so as not to upset the balance of the vehicle.
                  This deflection is handled by the spring in large part.
                  The softer the spring, the faster it deflects.
                  Lowering the car then causes the coil-over to compress and hence stiffer ride

                  You really don’t want the shock getting in the way of this because it would simply act like you added a stiffer spring.

                  However, once the wheel deflects & that energy gets stored in the spring, you don’t want it springing back very quickly so you do want the shock to slow it down.
                  This is why compression valving on a shock is always less than expansion damping.

                  So how do you know what valving is correct?

                  It’s basically a matter of looking at your spring (coils) rates.
                  If assuming you have a spring with 100 LB/in of rate, & you typically encounter 2-5 inch road bumps,
                  you’d want a shock that could damp down that force. 5” of deflection x 100 LB/inch would give you 500 pound force inches of force.

                  If we make this somewhat more realistic & use a 250 pound spring like you might find in a Corvette,
                  we’d then have 5” of deflection x 250 LB/in or 1250 pound-force inches.

                  If we use the Corvette on track then we have to factor in that the spring may be compressed fully & then we would have to calculate based on a real-world spring having about 9” of compression.
                  Using our 250 LB/in spring we would end up with 2250 pound force inches.

                  Now we would go look for a shock that offered about 50 Newton meters of compression force (75-100 if we wanted to remove the sway bars) and expansion valving around 250 Newton meters.

                  This assumes that the shock will be mounted vertically on the axle.

                  If the shock will be mounted in a canted (angled) fashion, allowances must be made.
                  You’d be smart to add a 10% stiffer shock for every 20 degrees of canted
                  You can now go to a custom shock manufacturer armed with your proper valving needs like Penske and see what shocks meets your needs.

                  In my Corvette I went further since the car sits very low over stock height I use a shock designed that is shorter travel & mounted upside down to lesson un-sprung weight.

                  I have suggested do not knee ****, allow different drive cycles/styles to allow the suspension to settle and then see if C8 needs any height adjustment,
                  that is if the makeup allows,
                  so I would not just lower the rear end as that even moves more weight rearward, (less weight over front tire road patch),
                  that is already supporting 60% plus of C8's total weight (including people weight) inducing more under-steer.
                  Corvettes owned, wrenched on and raced since 1975:
                  1974,75,77,84,87,89,91,93,94 ZR-1 & 1999 Mallett 435

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by majic1980 View Post
                    If you lower your C8 , let’s say an inch at all four corners that would NOT Affect corner weight
                    Wrong! if you don't measure the weight at each wheel, you don't know if the adjustment change was exactly the same for each wheel. plus, you don't have a base line weights to start from
                    .
                    for fun say one wheel picked up more weight when you lowered the car, I have stated this before on MECF you would have one wheel with less than idea weight and produces" the table with a short leg". That is what will happen.The car will have different right and left turn feedback. this is very well known in the suspension and alignment of high speed performance cars that are setup and worked on by true professionals . FACT !

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by meyerweb View Post

                      Just to clarify, the Z51 doesn't preclude adjusting the height. In fact, only the Z51 allows height adjustment. But as you know, with the lift you can only adjust the rear, not the front.

                      I would guess adjust the ride height at the rear wouldn't take a mechanic more than about an hour, followed by the cost of an alignment. But lowering the rear without being able to lower the front to match might result in an odd appearance.
                      I don't have the lift option.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Hebstar11 View Post

                        I don't have the lift option.
                        Are you getting a Z51? If so, you'll be able to lower all 4 corners. If not, there's no built in ability to lower the car.

                        Just based on the photos of the suspension we've seen, I'd guess no more than 2 hours for a professional mechanic with the right tools to lower all four, then the cost of a four wheel alignment.
                        SunKissed, my 2015 2LT, 7MT, Black over Daytona Sunrise Orange Metallic, Stingray convertible (One of about 40)

                        Purchased 5/2/2015,
                        >35,000+ miles

                        Proud member of the Old Dominion Corvette Club. Check us out http://www.olddominioncorvetteclub.org

                        Never grow up - It's a trap.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          If I decide to lower it, i'd prob have to wait on a set of lowering springs since as of now I am going non-z51. Anyone have any familiarity with aftermarket lowering springs for Corvettes?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Jljordann922 View Post
                            If I decide to lower it, i'd prob have to wait on a set of lowering springs since as of now I am going non-z51. Anyone have any familiarity with aftermarket lowering springs for Corvettes?
                            IF your going with the lift option then as now there is no way to a simple replacement to allow the fronts to be height/weight adjusted
                            IF your C8 will have the MRC option that also brings up a issue as how simple a swap will be

                            How about looking at what the cost is for the Z51 front coil-overs as to if yours has the MRC or not ?

                            Getting springs is not a issue as racers have used them for many years so lots of 3rd party to select from

                            BUT what you do have to do is select the correct spring rate. I think the springs for the base C8 are softer then the ones for Z51

                            If you select the wrong rate then they could be too soft and cause more body roll (which could help if any preexisting under-steer
                            or higher rate is too stiff of ride and induce more under-steer

                            If your going to buy 3rd party springs and do not know what the stock ones are you will have to either search for that info or
                            take a stock one off and measure the height with no load on them and then what the rate is measuring downward pressure ( any good shop should
                            have a tool for that)
                            And then choose a 3rd party one that is slightly shorter then stock ones but as mentioned you want to treat all 4 corners so that end results is best
                            height and corner weight you want to bias for higher speed corners to drag strip or changing over or under-steer

                            To have an adjuster for coil-over the shocks you choose must have the threads to be able to screw the adjuster up or down but before buying think this
                            out so you know what springs and shocks you want that give you the end results you want.

                            I am NOT suggesting people use this vendor,
                            this is only a way to see what questions they ask in selecting a coil-over based shock system and how the shock has threads on them for the adjuster
                            to screw higher or lower. to compress (less height [but stiffer] or less load on spring (taller and softer)

                            https://aldanamerican.com/coil-over-shocks/
                            Corvettes owned, wrenched on and raced since 1975:
                            1974,75,77,84,87,89,91,93,94 ZR-1 & 1999 Mallett 435

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Jljordann922 View Post
                              If I decide to lower it, i'd prob have to wait on a set of lowering springs since as of now I am going non-z51. Anyone have any familiarity with aftermarket lowering springs for Corvettes?
                              Since this is the first modern Corvette to come from the factory with coil springs, it'll be awhile before any aftermarket parts are available, I think. Since you're not getting Z51, you won't be getting the MRC, so TeamZR1's concerns about that component don't matter.

                              Give the aftermarket chance to get their hands on some C8s, and see what they come up with.
                              SunKissed, my 2015 2LT, 7MT, Black over Daytona Sunrise Orange Metallic, Stingray convertible (One of about 40)

                              Purchased 5/2/2015,
                              >35,000+ miles

                              Proud member of the Old Dominion Corvette Club. Check us out http://www.olddominioncorvetteclub.org

                              Never grow up - It's a trap.

                              Comment

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