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C8 “A” Pillars Hold 2.25X The Car’s Weight

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  • C8 “A” Pillars Hold 2.25X The Car’s Weight

    Thanks gmauthority for this article. Does it mean that every track would allow the HTC to race at their location. Personally, I think not. What do you think?

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    Originally posted by gmauthority
    2020 Corvette C8 A-Pillars Can Hold 2.25 Times Weight Of The Car: ExclusiveWhen it comes to fun in the sun and open-air motoring, it’s tough to beat the convertible body style. However, with unlimited headroom comes an increased risk of injury in the event of a rollover, an issue many modern convertibles address with a deployable roll bar. By contrast, the 2020 Corvette C8 features extra-high-strength A-pillars designed to withstand 2.25 times the weight of the car, thus superseding the need for a complex, weight-adding roll bar.


    In an interview with GM Authority, Corvette Chief Engineer Tadge Juechter laid out some of the details on why the 2020 Corvette doesn’t need additional rollover protection in the form of a deployable bar.



    “We designed the windshield pillars to hold 2.25 times the weight of the entire car. So you can turn the car upside down, and you can put another car on top of that, and still have room to spare,” Juechter said. “So it’s essentially a super strong roll bar,” he added, referring to the A-pillars.

    To note, this applies to both the 2020 Corvette Convertible and the 2020 Corvette Coupe, with both body style variants featuring the same ultra-high-strength A-pillar design. The commonality makes sense given that the Corvette Coupe features a removable hard top panel.



    The high-strength construction of the A-pillars also speaks to the overall strength and rigidity of the 2020 Corvette platform. Indeed, the high-strength construction also benefits other areas of the car beyond crash protection, such as enabling improved handling by way of precise tuning of the suspension system.



    As we covered before, the 2020 Corvette Convertible is actually ready for track duty right out of the box without any additional rollover protection needed, which is sure to delight those buyers looking to mix open-sky motoring with the occasional outing at the local race circuit. This also stands in contrast to the Corvette C7 Convertible, which did not offer the necessary rollover protection for track driving, without aftermarket upgrades.

    Subscribe to GM Authority for more mid-engine Corvette news, Corvette C8 news, Corvette news, Chevrolet news and around-the-clock GM news coverage.
    http://gmauthority.com/blog/2019/10/...car-exclusive/
    Last edited by John; 10-08-2019, 05:49 PM.
    GS7 Elkhart Lake Blue, HTO Twilight/Tension interior; Z51 & Mag Ride; E60 lift; 5ZZ high wing; 5VM vis CF ground effects pkg; FA5 interior vis CF; ZZ3 engine appearance; 3LT; Q8T Spectra Gray Tridents; J6N Edge Red Calipers; SNG Edge Red Hashmarks; VQK Splash Guards.

    Lifetime, annual contributors, and 20+ year members of National Corvette Museum.

  • #2
    Thats awesome information to put to rest the safety aspect of the c8 convertible. Doubt it would allow tracking the vehicle but from a street driven perspective its good to know.
    Torch Red exterior/ black interior z51 FE4 2LT or 1LT depending on when i get the call..Ill flip a coin at that moment..same for E60

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    • #3
      No they won’t. The A-pillars are only half the equation.

      Comment


      • #4
        Never mind the below. I misread the OP as talking about the rear structure, including the buttresses. This is basically the same standard as the C7 convertible, and I've not heard of any track allowing the C7 'vert in HPDEs without an additional roll bar.

        GMA's statement in the linked story that "“The hard top does give you the advantage that on some tracks, you may be able to run it,” Corvette Chief Engineer Tadge Juechter, told GM Authority in an interview." is hardly a guarantee.

        Holding a static load of 2.5 times the weight of a car isn't the same as dealing with the forces in a roll over, which include side loading from potentially multiple directions, and multiple impacts. But for that matter the aluminum hoop above the seat backs in the C7 coupe probably won't hold up in that situation either. It's nowhere near a real roll bar, with no support for forces from the sides, front or rear, yet almost all tracks allow the C7 Coupe to run HPDE's and similar events.

        Whether they will allow the C8 HTC with the top up may vary from track to track. Some are much stricter than others. GM making this statement will probably convince some tracks to allow them. Not for racing, mind you, but for HPDEs.
        Last edited by meyerweb; 10-08-2019, 07:10 PM.
        SunKissed, my 2015 2LT, 7MT, Black over Daytona Sunrise Orange Metallic, Stingray convertible (One of about 40)

        Purchased 5/2/2015,
        >35,000+ miles

        Proud member of the Old Dominion Corvette Club. Check us out http://www.olddominioncorvetteclub.org

        Never grow up - It's a trap.

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        • #5
          According to ToolHoarder
          C8 Convertible formally added to NASA "Approved Convertible" list for HPDE use
          I was able to get GM to confirm the roll-over strategy in writing to NASA's national office (not the Space folks). As of this evening, the C8 HT vert will be added to the "approved convertible" list for HPDE use. The ultimate decision-maker is the track so they may over-rule NASA, but in general, the car is cleared for HPDE use.
          GS7 Elkhart Lake Blue, HTO Twilight/Tension interior; Z51 & Mag Ride; E60 lift; 5ZZ high wing; 5VM vis CF ground effects pkg; FA5 interior vis CF; ZZ3 engine appearance; 3LT; Q8T Spectra Gray Tridents; J6N Edge Red Calipers; SNG Edge Red Hashmarks; VQK Splash Guards.

          Lifetime, annual contributors, and 20+ year members of National Corvette Museum.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by John View Post
            According to ToolHoarder

            I was able to get GM to confirm the roll-over strategy in writing to NASA's national office (not the Space folks). As of this evening, the C8 HT vert will be added to the "approved convertible" list for HPDE use. The ultimate decision-maker is the track so they may over-rule NASA, but in general, the car is cleared for HPDE use.
            1234567890

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            Last edited by meyerweb; 10-08-2019, 08:08 PM.
            SunKissed, my 2015 2LT, 7MT, Black over Daytona Sunrise Orange Metallic, Stingray convertible (One of about 40)

            Purchased 5/2/2015,
            >35,000+ miles

            Proud member of the Old Dominion Corvette Club. Check us out http://www.olddominioncorvetteclub.org

            Never grow up - It's a trap.

            Comment


            • #7
              During my brief SCCA amateur racing career, I saw many rollovers. Typically, a driver would overcook it going into a sharp curve or corner, the car would get sideways, and all the forward energy would flip the car over and go into rotating momentum. I remember open top cars rolling over seven times or more before coming to a stop. These cars typically had steel roll bars covering the full width of the passenger compartment, with a forward brace to keep the bar from bending forward or backward, and a diagonal cross brace to keep the rectangular shape bar from becoming a parallelogram.

              Thankfully, in all the races I saw, the bars did the job and the drivers walked away. But I would have my doubts about a couple of hard points hat would hold a little over twice the car's weight as a static load. A violent rollover has lots and lots of kinetic energy to dissipate.
              Last edited by Milliwatt Rob; 10-08-2019, 08:24 PM.

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              • #8
                ^^^
                Certainly wouldn't rely on the built-in protection on either the coupe or convertible for racing. But for HPDEs, they're probably fine. I know I'm not going to be anywhere near 10/10ths in the car I need to drive home in.
                SunKissed, my 2015 2LT, 7MT, Black over Daytona Sunrise Orange Metallic, Stingray convertible (One of about 40)

                Purchased 5/2/2015,
                >35,000+ miles

                Proud member of the Old Dominion Corvette Club. Check us out http://www.olddominioncorvetteclub.org

                Never grow up - It's a trap.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I would really question as to safety that the thin metal at upper A pillar would support 8,800 pounds plus the force on corners in a hard roll
                  Compare that to the roll protection of B pillar

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                  Corvettes owned and raced since 1975:
                  1974,75,77,84,87,89,93,94 ZR-1 & 1999 Mallett 435

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                  • #10
                    2.25X vehicle weight is nothing to crow about as far as rollover protection. Here is what the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety has to say,

                    "A good rating requires a strength-to-weight ratio of at least 4. In other words, the roof must withstand a force of at least 4 times the vehicle's weight before the plate crushes the roof by 5 inches. For an acceptable rating, the minimum required strength-to-weight ratio is 3.25. For a marginal rating, it is 2.5. Anything lower than that is poor."

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