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Corvette Today Podcast With Kai Spande BGA Manager

On this episode of CORVETTE TODAY, you get to meet the Corvette Plant Manager for the Bowling Green Assembly Plant, Kai Spande!
Your host, Steve Garrett, introduces you to Kai as he traces his career with GM. Kai talks about how the Bowling Green Assembly Plant transitioned from the front engine, C7 Corvette, to the mid-engine C8 Corvette. You'll get insights on the plant expansion and how they made that all happen...giving the new C8 Corvette a true state-of-the-art build facility. Kai also tells you about the Corvettes he has owned and the funny story of how he loved Corvettes, but never thought he'd get to work for it during his tenure at GM. Get to personally know Corvette Plant Manager, Kai Spande, on this episode of CORVETTE TODAY!

Listen here: https://adori.page.link/corvette-today
Website: www.CorvetteTodayPodcast.com
YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXCRn-2X0SjjEXUt_...
Get CORVETTE TODAY emails: https://CorvetteToday.ck.page
CORVETTE TODAY Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2718423201763136
NEW!!! Get CORVETTE TODAY merchandise here: https://www.agpestores.com//lanmarxgraphix/grouppr...
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Official Z06 Speculation Thread

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  • John if history is any guide…https://www.corvetteblogger.com/2019...ion-breakdown/
    07/01/20 Deposit @ VanBortels on 2021 C8 Coupe; 08/01/20 Prelim Order Status 1100; 01/21/21 Final Order Status 2000; 01/27/21 Status 3000; 03/06/21 Status 3300 (TPW 03/22/21); 03/16/21 Status 3400; 03/22/21 Status 3800; 03/23/21 Status 4B00; 03/26/21 Status 4D00: Status 4200; 04/02/21; 04/06/21 Status 5000; 2LT Coupe; GMO; DSZ; Q8Q; HTA; AQ9; E60; FE2; NPP; ERI

    ”I’m not the best in town, but I’m the best, until the best comes around“

    Comment


    • Originally posted by SheepDog View Post
      The complete build out of the line of C8 variants may be in a race against the shifting forces of climate change. Ghost forest! Wild fires. Deluge, hurricane and tornado in unprecedented time, location and severity. It is a 3 X 3 X 3 Body problem.
      You forgot pestilence, locusts, death of all first born male children, earthquakes, asteroids, mass starvation, dam breaching, and crosswalk fading due to global warming, oops...global climate change.

      C7 Track Dedicated Z51
      Rollbar, tow hook, Z06 grill, short throw shifter, upgraded rotors/pads/wheels/tires, dashcam.
      2018 Honda Goldwing
      2018 Suzuki V-Strom
      Track Day Addict, Latin America Adventure Biker, and Medicare Recipient.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by VetteStromWing View Post
        You forgot pestilence, locusts, death of all first born male children, earthquakes, asteroids, mass starvation, dam breaching, and crosswalk fading due to global warming, oops...global climate change.
        I hear you. But. Climate change is herky-jerky. Policy is a football..Every day is a brand new world.

        Comment


        • How about instead of the preceding doom and gloom we focus on health, hope, happiness, family, our friends, we pay our bills, live in a house, have or are getting a new Corvette and the million other sources of joy that are today and in our future?
          GBA Black; HTO Twilight/Tension interior; Z51 & Mag Ride; E60 lift; 5VM visible carbon fiber package; 5ZZ high wing; FA5 interior vis CF; ZZ3 engine appearance; 3LT; Q8T Spectra Gray Tridents; J6N Edge Red Calipers; SNG Edge Red Hashmarks; VQK Splash Guards; RCC Edge Red engine cover; VJR illuminated sill plates. Lifetime, annual contributors, and 23 year members of National Corvette Museum. Home is the beautiful Pacific Northwest.

          Comment


          • The site isn't allowing me access to this thread from the notification page.
            2021 ELB, 2LT, Red Interior, Red Calipers, Standard Wheels, Front Lift, NPP,
            MM Deposit Dec. 15, 2020
            May 15, 21 2000
            May 18, 21 3000

            Comment


            • Which means someone posted a comment and then deleted it which prevents you direct access to a message no longer displayed.
              Rapid Blue 3LT, HTO Tension Blue, Z51, 5ZZ, E60, ZZ3, ZYC, FE4, J6N, FA5, Q8Q, SHW, VJR, C2Q, R8C

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              • Originally posted by rickg747 View Post
                Which means someone posted a comment and then deleted it which prevents you direct access to a message no longer displayed.
                Thank you.
                2021 ELB, 2LT, Red Interior, Red Calipers, Standard Wheels, Front Lift, NPP,
                MM Deposit Dec. 15, 2020
                May 15, 21 2000
                May 18, 21 3000

                Comment


                • How much C8 R will be bred into the the C8 to create the Z06.


                  ________________________________

                  2020 Chevrolet Corvette C8 vs. C8.R: How the Race and Road Cars Are Different

                  Nick Yekikian Writer Oct 14, 2019 [Extracts from Article in Automobile

                  . . . Road cars and their endurance-racing counterparts may look alike, sometimes sharing body panels, headlights, and even engine architecture, but in general, the stripped-out, lightened race cars you see competing at Le Mans and elsewhere are very little like the vehicles you can go out and buy. Chevy says its new Corvette C8.R, however, shares more parts with its production equivalent than any other Corvette race car to date. Though that may be true—some 80 percent of the structural components are carried over—the list of changes from road car to race car is still extensive. Let's go over some of the biggest differences between the regular C8 Corvette and the C8.R that will race in the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship.

                  Engine And Transmission


                  . . . The C8.R on the other hand makes 500 horsepower and 480 lb-ft of torque from its 5.5-liter DOHC V-8. These two engines are basically polar opposites. The V-8 in the race car has overhead cams and a flat-plane crankshaft, which together allow it to rev higher and breathe better. One result of this is its much higher specific output. . . The engine in the race car is tuned for high-end power to help deliver maximum punch down the long straights of a track.

                  . ./ . the C8.R features an Xtrac six-speed sequential racing gearbox. Dual-clutch transmissions are quick-shifting, but the six-speed sequential in the race car is no doubt even faster. It's also worth noting that Corvette Racing says that while it may learned something from development of Cadillac's Blackwing twin-turbo DOHC V-8, the engines aren't related.


                  Dimensions

                  . . . the C8 Stingray with the Z51 performance package it came in at 3,587 pounds, a gain of 151 pounds over the C7 Stingray. The C8.R is a featherweight by comparison. Chevy quotes a weight of just 2,733 pounds for its mid-engine racer. The race car is also 4.6 inches wider and 3.4 inches lower than the standard Corvette.

                  Aerodynamics

                  . . . The road car has to comply with road safety standards and, as a result, can't sport a massive rear wing and huge dive planes. And while racing regulations do exist to try and control what the cars are capable of, race engineers get a lot more freedom to play with the air and help produce downforce and reduce drag on the C8.R.

                  . . . The roadgoing C8 makes 400 pounds of downforce at 180 mph with the Z51 pack equipped. Expect the race car to make much, much more than that.

                  Brakes And Tires

                  . . . Brakes and tires are hugely different between the two cars. The road-legal C8 has normal steel brakes comprised of 13.3-inch rotors up front and 13.8-inch rotors in the rear. All four are clamped by four-piston calipers. The race car gets six-piston monoblock calipers up front to help save some weight, and a four-piston setup in the rear. It still uses steel rotors, but the discs are much bigger, measuring 15.35 inches up front and 14.0 inches out back. Not only that, but the street-legal Vette is brake-by-wire, whereas the C8.R is a conventional setup.

                  . . . The suspensions differ, too. The regular model uses a conventional passive spring and damper setup, and can be upgraded to feature Chevy's magnetorheological dampers. The suspension in the race car uses a short/long arm (SLA) double-A-arm suspension, fabricated steel upper and lower control arms, and fully adjustable coil-over shock absorbers.

                  When it comes to rubber, the C8 Stingray is fitted with Michelin Pilot Sport 4S three-season tires, but the racer sits on Michelin-supplied slicks. The wheels of the race car are four inches wider at the front and two inches wider at the rear when compared to the standard car. Diameter on the C8.R is 18 inches all the way around while the street car sits on a staggered, 19-inch-front, 20-inch-rear arrangement.

                  Comment


                  • This is several months old and some may have seen it, but if GM can deliver a Z06 with a body that looks an awful lot like the camo’d image in this article and fitted with a FPC and upgraded DCT, then I will be in heaven.

                    Originally posted by corvette-mag via WildHammerMotorSports
                    CHEVROLET CORVETTE C8.R'S AERODYNAMIC BREAKDOWN.


                    Posted by Sean A. on Jan 22nd 2021

                    A racecar's performance relies on the function of every area of the cars operation. This includes, top speed, cornering speed, braking, tire wear, and overall stability. Each of these operations are directly affected by the vehicles aerodynamic performance.

                    We all strive to "cheat the wind" when talking about hyper-efficient aero designs, however, thanks to the immutable laws of physics this is not really possible. Engineers are constantly re-designing aero parts to better manage airflow effectively and harness the winds power when possible. In terms of racing, this is a much more difficult task as they are required to stay within the rules of the vehicles class limits. This is exactly what the corvette racing team did with the C8.R.



                    (Source: Corvette-mag.com)

                    The teams goal was to maximize downforce and minimize drag equally at all speeds. They also needed to provide sufficient cooling to the engine, transmission, brakes, air-conditioning condenser, and other components throughout the car by diverting air through the vehicle.

                    One of the most testing parts of enhancing streamlined features is the fact that sometimes the design objectives contradict each other. For instance, while it's alluring to both diminish drag and increment downforce, accomplishing the last will in general apply an undesirable effect on the previous. Over the long haul, engineers have discovered creative approaches to progress alluring attributes while limiting negative side-effects.

                    Aero testing started long before the first factor for Chevy’s C8.R development automobile was manufactured, inside intensely effective computer systems directed by means of equally effective programs using numerical evaluation and data structures. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is the department of computer-aided engineering that permits for this. CFD analyzes fluid drift in accordance with its velocity, pressure, temperature, viscosity, and different bodily properties, with the use of extraordinarily state-of-the-art mathematical equations. CFD evaluation was utilized in the Corvette racecar’s individual elements and sub-assemblies, in addition to the automobile in its entirety.

                    Another advanced tool used to analyze aerodynamics is Chevrolet's state-of-the-art driver-in-the-loop (DiL) simulator. The machine allows for racers to virtually "drive" a developing race car on the same track it will race on.



                    (Source: Corvette-mag.com)

                    “This is the first time we’ve been able to drive a racecar before it existed…in real life,” explains Corvette Racing pilot Tommy Milner. “[With the C8.R] we could drive iterations of it based on theories and what engineers thought would work. That, for me, was an entirely new experience. Being a part of that has been the most fun part of the entire process."

                    “Trying different fundamental changes in the car and seeing what our window is to work within has been great,” Milner continues. “It’s a tool for the engineers to understand what we, as drivers, can deal with, from the mechanical side to the aero side. Just like the DiL is a tool for us to get up to speed at a track, it’s a tool for the engineers to try things that take too long or are just wild ideas that you can’t try at the track.”

                    After all the calculations and computer modeling it was time for the physical testing to begin. as with all of the teams other vehicles, the C8.R's testing was done both in the wind tunnel and at various tracks across the country. Although Corvette Racing engineers have an immense record of knowledge built up from their almost a quarter century of experience, the new eighth generation of Corvettes dramatically changed the architecture of the vehicle which meant there needed to be some aerodynamic considerations.

                    The most noticeable change was the relocation of the engine to the rear of the vehicle. This resulted in a large amount of space in the front end, allowing engineers to improve upon the front diffuser and its support structures. On the opposite end of the car is a more compact gearbox designed by Xtrac specifically for the C8.R also freed up more room for the rear diffuser.

                    While both the front and rear end were optimized, it is important that there is a balance between both. With a Clean-Sheet design, creating downforce at the front end is easy given the car is moving through clean air. The problem lies in the rear as that area never has the same volume or quality of airflow. The C8.R's carefully sculpted under-floor and precisely designed body allowed for more airflow to reach the rear wing and diffuser creating a higher downforce while keeping the front and rear balanced.

                    IMSA GTLM and FIA GTE rules allowed considerable freedom with how the airflow is fed into the engine and cooled the car's multiple components so the team were able to find new more efficient ways of directing the air. Unlike the street driven C8, which takes in engine air through the body side scoops, the C8.R intake is a forward facing scoop under the base of the rear window. This design was not used on the street application due to the fact it blocks the drivers rear view. Corvette Racing Team decided to use a rear facing camera as the only rear sightline. Therefore the vehicles engine scoop always has a streamline of fresh, high-speed air without interrupting the airflow to the rear wing ensuring its effectiveness.



                    (Source: Corvette-mag.com)

                    The use of the rear engine scoop freed up the side scoops to perform its job elsewhere, including providing cooling air to the engine and gearbox. In previous corvette models the separation of the engine from the transaxle made keeping each components temperature level an easier task. Now that the engine and transaxle are both located in the rear, keeping each one cool has become a considerably more difficult job.

                    Previous Corvette racing models had much of their ancillary components cooled passively, meaning, they were cooled by the air circulating around them. The C8.R clustered these parts with the powertrain causing the development team to use heat shielding and active cooling ducts which directs air through the side scoops to where they are most needed.

                    Comparatively to other corvette models, the C8.R had its engine radiator located in the front by the Frunk storage area. The air comes through the center mounted grille, passes through the radiator, then exits through four ducts. There are two ducts on the hood by the windshield and two ducts behind each front wheel. The relocation of the engine to the rear of the vehicle allowed for these ducts to be put in place ensuring that the development team maximized the efficiency of airflow that front-engine corvettes could not do. The front-engine corvettes lacked sufficient space to route airflow out the sides. The older models routed all the air through one large duct on the hood.



                    (Source: Corvette-mag.com)

                    "The size of each duct exhausting air that has passed through the radiator has been balanced to meet the aero requirements of the car,” explains Corvette Racing Program Manager Ben Johnson. “It represents a fairly novel concept from the aero team to capitalize on the architecture of the car.”

                    Come the end of 2019, the new vehicles homologation was finished, all developments were set in place. more than two years worth of design, development, and testing brought a new-generation of Corvette Racing that incredibly outperforms anything that came before.

                    Due to the Balance of Performance adjustments rule by IMSA and the FIA/ACO the C8.R will not go around the track dramatically faster than the C7.Rs. However, the improved aerodynamics will make the car felt in other ways. This means the car will be more fuel efficient, have a greater tire longevity, and will be more consistent over the entire duration of each stint. This will also allow for the team to respond to different ambient factors and track conditions more effectively. In whole the C8.Rs aero improvements will play a crucial role in this vehicle's success on and off the track.
                    https://wildhammermotorsports.com/bl...JAtyj7FXy2RB1o

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Missileer View Post
                      This is several months old and some may have seen it, but if GM can deliver a Z06 with a body that looks an awful lot like the camo’d image in this article and fitted with a FPC and upgraded DCT, then I will be in heaven

                      https://wildhammermotorsports.com/bl...JAtyj7FXy2RB1o
                      A lot of us are thinking the ZO6 will be very similar to the C8R.
                      Rocket City Florida- 2001 ZO6 - 2013 427 Vert - 2020 Stingray

                      Comment


                      • And Corvette Blogger put this out today.

                        https://www.corvetteblogger.com/2021...erm=2021-06-10

                        My guess at this point is that the Z06 Reveal happens next Spring, with the 2023 models including the Z06 starting production in the summer of 2022. Some others have predicted a reveal later this fall, and then moving up the start of the 2023 model year to the Spring of 2022 to accommodate it. A while back we had a Chevy sales rep confirming a July 2021 reveal, but we don’t think Chevy would reveal the new Z06 so far in advance of when it intends to start building, so I think we are back to the regular production calendar.

                        We are pretty confident that the C8 Z06 will be ready for primetime once Chevy gives the green light. Corvette Racing is doing the engine development with the new 5.5L flat-plane crank V8 engine as its being torture-tested on some of the greatest racing circuits in the world. We are also expecting some new revelations between now and the reveal to come out that show how serious the Corvette Team is in making the Z06 competitive against the world’s best sportscars.
                        Rapid Blue 3LT, HTO Tension Blue, Z51, 5ZZ, E60, ZZ3, ZYC, FE4, J6N, FA5, Q8Q, SHW, VJR, C2Q, R8C

                        Comment


                        • Question #1
                          What would you prefer to know? If you had to make a choice. Could only know one of the following four. 1. the specs. 2. the visual appearance. 3. the price(s) of car and options. 4. the date(s).

                          Question #2
                          Which three of the four do you feel more confident, that you already can guess most accurately?

                          -----------
                          My answer is that I most want to know #4.

                          Think that I can reasonably guess #1, #2, and #3 most accurately.
                          Last edited by SheepDog; 06-10-2021, 06:18 PM.

                          Comment


                          • Fun questions. My vote is for “visual appearance” because I already know the Corvette engineers will have kick *** performance coming from the Z06.
                            GBA Black; HTO Twilight/Tension interior; Z51 & Mag Ride; E60 lift; 5VM visible carbon fiber package; 5ZZ high wing; FA5 interior vis CF; ZZ3 engine appearance; 3LT; Q8T Spectra Gray Tridents; J6N Edge Red Calipers; SNG Edge Red Hashmarks; VQK Splash Guards; RCC Edge Red engine cover; VJR illuminated sill plates. Lifetime, annual contributors, and 23 year members of National Corvette Museum. Home is the beautiful Pacific Northwest.

                            Comment


                            • To answer the big dog's question, I vote for the specs. [clint eastwood voice] Go ahead, make me drool. [/clint eastwood voice]

                              Settle the NA v. TT debate. If NA, what's the gearing and how many gears? How much does it weigh? How much does downforce change with active aero?
                              2021 Red Mist HTC / Z51 /Mag Ride / Yellow Calipers / C-Flash Mirrors and Wing / Front Lift / Black 3LT / CF Interior Trim / Yellow Belts and Stitching

                              Atomic Orange C6. Plenty of engine and suspension mods. Gone, but not forgotten

                              Comment


                              • Visual packages ...Im more conservative and prefer not to have a lot of spats and wings. I realize Im in a minority but since you asked. I know some think active aero would be expensive yet years past that hasnt been the case with other manufacturers.

                                im hopeful for three aero packages. One much like the Porsche 911r with little to no aero. One with the big wing and front spats for those that want that ultimate downforce and then the active aero for that sleek yet heavy downforce.

                                i personally need downforce. I have never felt my corvettes get light even up around 150 mph. I rarely go that fast and my track experiences I'm the limiting factor not the car.

                                I prefer sleek and smooth designs and the added performance from the more powerful engine and wider wheels and tires would be for my ego more than a real need. This c8 stingray with 500 hp is more than enough. 617hp is for the engine sound.


                                hell even the wider wheels and tires are more ego than need. I have yet to reach or surpass current handling and braking capabilities.


                                with previous generation corvettes...they were easy to surpass the limits of adhesion. Always able to dance on the edge.

                                This generation is a totally different game. Just my opinion over the past 7k miles so far.

                                Comment

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