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Corvette Today Podcast Latest Corvette News

Wow....there is so much Corvette news coming out right now.   Keith Cornett from CorvetteBlogger.com joins your host, Steve Garrett to cover it all. https://anchor.fm/steve-garrett/epis...e-2021-e12kai2  Check out some of the headlines below....
1.  GM Cancels June Allocation – 3000 status orders to be completed
2.  Chevrolet releases details and pricing on 2022 Corvette
3.  Chevrolet will offer a Corvette C8.R Special Edition for 2022
4.  2022 C8 Corvette Visualizer is now live
5.  Right-hand drive C8’s arrive in Japan and revealed at Fuji Speedway
6.  Ordering Opens in Australia and New Zealand
7.  GM still working out details for 2023 Racing Program
8.  Juan Pablo Montoya loves the Indy 500 pace car C8 Corvette!
9.  With C8 details out for 2022, the Z06 will most likely be a 2023 model
10.  Pre-owned Corvette pricing up 34% in the last year
...and there's lots more!  Don't miss this episode of CORVETTE TODAY.
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Interview with C8’s Color And Trim Design Manager Brett Golliff Thanks To AutoBlog

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  • Interview with C8’s Color And Trim Design Manager Brett Golliff Thanks To AutoBlog

    C8’s Color/Trim Designer Manager was interviewed as to what the mid engine configuration does to its interior design. This is part of an interview with the C8’s Color & Trim Manager Brett Golliff. I had the pleasure of talking with him the night of the reveal for at least ten minutes. What an accessible, friendly and knowledgeable person! For the rest of his comments, please go to the link. Thank you AutoBlog!

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    https://www.autoblog.com/2019/08/21/.../#slide-endcap

    Originally posted by AutoBlog
    Color and Trim Design Manager Brett Golliff talks 2020 Chevy Corvette interior

    Learn how engine placement affects cabin design

    TONY MARKOVICH

    Aug 21st 2019 at 12:00PM

    The all-new eighth-generation mid-engined Chevrolet Corvette won't be available to purchase until early 2020, and that might be a good thing. The C8 has more configurations than ever, including 12 different exterior paints, so the extra time might be necessary before settling on the right spec. To better understand exactly what we're looking at, we spoke to Chevrolet Global's Color and Trim Design Manager Brett Golliff, who went into heavy detail about design, color theory, Corvette heritage and, yes, that row of buttons.

    This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

    What was your impression when you first saw the finished product?

    There are two ways of looking at the final product. There’s a sense that we have various design gates that we go through to finish a design. Our major one is DSO, which is Design Sign Off, and that’s done well before there is a functioning vehicle. But if you were to see the model of it, these things look dead on, they look like real-life automobiles. And quite frankly, if you were to walk past it and not know, it might actually fool you into thinking that is a fully functioning product. So seeing that is phenomenal, it’s beautiful. You see all your previous few years of hard work come to full fruition. And it’s like, alright, this is the full package, you could see it at certain angles, and pick and choose the angle that you think is going to be the most beautiful spot for the car and where it really tells the full story.

    However, it was a completely different experience when you got to the actual unveil, which was inside this hangar that felt three miles long. I got to see the car from about a quarter-mile away, and that was my first time seeing it that far apart. But being able to see it so far away, there’s this awe-inspiring feeling, this moment of “this is real, this is incredible.”

    And it still meets the vision that’s in your head, and somehow it’s even better in the sense that everything that we created internally on those original models were created by us. So of course they’re going to be perfect. We had the opportunity to put every ounce of our energy into that, but to see the final piece that’s in production and real could still capture and meet every expectation of that original one is very surreal. It’s not something I take lightly. It’s just an incredible feeling of gratefulness.

    What were you guys trying to accomplish with the new Stingray emblem and how did it end up on the rear deck?

    With our branding and badging, in general, we try to make it fresh and updated to what the theme is going toward. Everything is a modern iteration of where we last were, so the Stingray was nothing different than that. There were a lot of variations and a lot of interpretations of what that design was, and it just modernized it and brought it into the next generation. [Its placement] integrates so well. It looks like it pulls the window graphic over the motor right into a point. It just finalizes at the Stingray.

    What was your initial mission when first approaching the C8 interior design?

    Our mission wasn’t that different for any of us, whether it was exterior, interior, or engineering. We were really embracing what mid-engine layout and architecture gave us. I think that’s what was most inspiring from an interior standpoint.

    Sometimes when you get projects, you just start drawing, and I think you can always see those projects where somebody just started drawing. With this, we stepped back and were like, “What are the benefits? What do we gain from this? What are we able to do on this architecture that we were not able to do on C7? What is it providing not only us, but the consumer in the end result for the capability of this vehicle?”

    Some of the main things were lowering the instrument panel (IP), making a better cockpit structure around you, making visibility greater, telling an aesthetic story that goes from the front to the rear and the rear to the front, and making sure that everything flows and is kept moving. But the main standpoint was making it the ultimate driving experience for the driver and having it be this full-on embracement of mid-engine architecture.

    What are some advantages over the C7?

    The main thing is wider visibility, so you can see the road that surrounds you. The pillars are sort of pulled back and around the driver. The other standpoint is camera placement for the rear side, because blind spots aren’t nearly as dramatic as they are on the C7.

    You’ll instantly notice how low the IP is. Comparatively, the C7’s is more upright, more traditional, for lack of a better term. This really lowers and pushes down closer to you and gives you full visibility of the road. People were very worried that you weren’t going to see the frunk area enough, but that’s very much still a part of our aesthetic. It drives down through it, but you follow it right down into the road from the IP, it’s pretty incredible.

    How did the team arrive at the single row of buttons in the middle?

    Very similar to how we just discussed the rest of the interior. A lot of it became about placement and functionality of what was around the driver. As we sat there, we knew we wanted to have tactile buttons. We didn’t want to go completely digital with it. When you look at the theme, we wanted it to be that cockpit piece, and it just flows naturally right along that beam. So it became about angling it properly, making it look like it was intended to be there, and following the ergonomics of how you visualize it.
    Thank you again AutoBlog and Brett Golliff. For the rest of the interview, please go the link.
    GBA Black; HTO Twilight/Tension interior; Z51 & Mag Ride; E60 lift; 5VM visible carbon fiber package; 5ZZ high wing; FA5 interior vis CF; ZZ3 engine appearance; 3LT; Q8T Spectra Gray Tridents; J6N Edge Red Calipers; SNG Edge Red Hashmarks; VQK Splash Guards; RCC Edge Red engine cover; VJR illuminated sill plates. Lifetime, annual contributors, and 23 year members of National Corvette Museum. Home is the beautiful Pacific Northwest.

  • #2
    Interesting article John, I hope we get the opportunity to sit in the C8 at Carlisle this weekend. I want to see how it compares to my old NSX as far as forward visibility and feel. You very much feel like you are "out in the air" in the NSX, if that makes sense to anyone. I hope the C8 gives a similar experience, not all mid-engine cars do that.

    Comment


    • #3
      Fascinating and informative to hear the thought process that went into every detail of the cockpit. Order is complete, now I can’t wait to sit in it and drive it.

      Comment


      • #4
        This is what he had to say about the row of buttons that eliminates the passenger armrest:

        So it became about angling it properly, making it look like it was intended to be there, and following the ergonomics of how you visualize it.
        "Following the ergonomics of how you visualize it."

        They think ergonomics describes the way you visualize something? *** does that even mean?

        No wonder it's an ergonomic disaster. I really like the rest of the interior but after having sat in the passenger seat I concluded that row of buttons is a stupid gimmick.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by electroVette View Post
          This is what he had to say about the row of buttons that eliminates the passenger armrest:



          "Following the ergonomics of how you visualize it."

          They think ergonomics describes the way you visualize something? *** does that even mean?

          No wonder it's an ergonomic disaster. I really like the rest of the interior but after having sat in the passenger seat I concluded that row of buttons is a stupid gimmick.
          Can the passenger control any of their info from the dash area? Like the C7 has for passengers

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by bobbytinvab View Post
            Interesting article John, I hope we get the opportunity to sit in the C8 at Carlisle this weekend. I want to see how it compares to my old NSX as far as forward visibility and feel. You very much feel like you are "out in the air" in the NSX, if that makes sense to anyone. I hope the C8 gives a similar experience, not all mid-engine cars do that.
            I agree. When I drove the Gen. 1 NSX back in ‘92, the driver’s position was the feature that most amazed me. If a driver has not experienced
            that view and feeling that results, it cannot be adequately described. I’ve been seeking that viewpoint in a reliable performance
            vehicle ever since. Thoroughly enjoyed my C5 & C6, but look forward to being amazed by my C8.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by TtiME View Post

              Can the passenger control any of their info from the dash area? Like the C7 has for passengers
              What do you mean "info"? The passenger seat and HVAC buttons are in the row of buttons in the console.
              Delivered 5/29!: Scarlet Fever 2021 2LT HTC, Red Mist Metallic Tintcoat, two-tone Natural w/ suede inserts, Mag Ride, Performance Exhaust

              Current C7: SunKissed, 2015 2LT, 7MT, Black over Daytona Sunrise Orange Metallic, Stingray convertible

              Proud member of the Old Dominion Corvette Club: https://www.olddominioncorvetteclub.org/

              Never grow up - It's a trap.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by meyerweb View Post

                What do you mean "info"? The passenger seat and HVAC buttons are in the row of buttons in the console.
                On the C7 you have the passenger temp and htd/vented control on the right side of the dash will also available in the center dash. Does the C8 have controls incorporated in the dash for the passenger as well as on the center stack or is it on the dash vents? Reaching that center stack for the passenger looks like a real pain.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by TtiME View Post

                  On the C7 you have the passenger temp and htd/vented control on the right side of the dash will also available in the center dash. Does the C8 have controls incorporated in the dash for the passenger as well as on the center stack or is it on the dash vents? Reaching that center stack for the passenger looks like a real pain.
                  No, it has them easily reachable by the passenger right in the middle. On the C7 the ones in the center are hard for the passenger to reach because of the grab handle. On the C8 they are easy for the passenger to reach. No need for a second set.
                  Delivered 5/29!: Scarlet Fever 2021 2LT HTC, Red Mist Metallic Tintcoat, two-tone Natural w/ suede inserts, Mag Ride, Performance Exhaust

                  Current C7: SunKissed, 2015 2LT, 7MT, Black over Daytona Sunrise Orange Metallic, Stingray convertible

                  Proud member of the Old Dominion Corvette Club: https://www.olddominioncorvetteclub.org/

                  Never grow up - It's a trap.

                  Comment

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