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  • Ferrari-for-Working-Stiffs

    Great article at SAE from none other than the man himself, Don Sherman.

    https://www.sae.org/news/2019/07/2020-chevrolet-corvette-intro

    Click image for larger version  Name:	SAE.PNG Views:	2 Size:	662.6 KB ID:	50599


    I have been working on, tuning, building, tweaking, and otherwise playing with Chevy small block engines for over 50 years now. But with those side-mounted hold-down bolts on the valve covers with the black phosphate fasteners, the stamped-in C8 logos, and those stainless steel tubular headers, our new C8s will have the most beautiful small block Chevy engine that I have ever seen.
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    Last edited by Shepherd777; 07-24-2019, 07:22 AM.
    Bob Sliwa
    "I was cruising in my Stingray, late one night, when a Tesla Model S, pulled up on the right......."
    Currently Building an All-Electric,1963 Split-Window Coupe Ludicrous Speed Restomod.
    Ludicrous Speed - https://youtu.be/ygE01sOhzz0

    2020 C8 ELB - Event Status 666 - Completely destroyed at the race track due to year 2020! Insured!!!
    2022-2023? E-Ray - Number 4 on the List at MacMulkin!

  • #2
    Thank You for the article

    Comment


    • #3
      Good article, and thanks for posting the link. One tidbit I found interesting:

      “No Corvette has ever felt so comfortable, nimble, and stable,” Juechter exclaimed. “We’re confident our customers will admire the strides we’ve achieved in ride quality. And now that the car’s center of gravity is very close to the occupants’ hip points, the feeling during acceleration and braking is analogous to riding at the center—instead of the ends—of a teeter-totter. There’s practically no sense of pitch motion in the cockpit.”
      Reducing the "teeter-totter" effect can have some negative side effects.
      1. When pushing the car hard, drivers depend on the feeling of pitch & dive to give them immediate feedback on how the car is performing and how close to the limits they are. If you had zero sensations of this type it would be like playing a video game, you would have to depend on your eyes for feedback instead of feeling it with your body. So let's hope that while teeter-tottering may be reduced, there's enough left to provide useful feedback.
      2. For similar reasons I predict some people will complain that the car doesn't "feel fast". That is, they don't get the same feeling of the car squatting under hard acceleration. Despite the numbers proving otherwise, they'll insist that it just doesn't feel as good.

      Comment


      • #4
        A good looking engine for sure ... and sooo easy to twin turbo if desired ... the wait is going to be looong

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Klinn View Post
          [*]For similar reasons I predict some people will complain that the car doesn't "feel fast". That is, they don't get the same feeling of the car squatting under hard acceleration. Despite the numbers proving otherwise, they'll insist that it just doesn't feel as good.[/LIST]
          Interesting. Well you know people love to have something to complain about, so count on it not feeling good to them.
          2020 Convertible, Torch Red, 2LT, NPP, Natural, GT1, E60, Q8Q, perpetual status 3000

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          • #6
            Here is a quote from the article: "A new electrical architecture provides quicker subsystem communication, fewer wires, enhanced display screen resolution, greater security measures and the ability to update the Corvette’s software over the air via WiFi."

            A new electrical architecture sure sounds like there is something to the 12V/48V system talked about elsewhere on the forum.

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            • #7
              Thank you Shepherd777. I talked with Don at the Reveal. He was genuine excited about what he was seeing (as we 98% of us, e.g., on the moon).
              GBA Black; HTO Twilight/Tension interior; Z51 & Mag Ride; E60 lift; 5VM visible carbon fiber package; 5ZZ high wing; FA5 interior vis CF; ZZ3 engine appearance; 3LT; Q8T Spectra Gray Tridents; J6N Edge Red Calipers; SNG Edge Red Hashmarks; VQK Splash Guards; RCC Edge Red engine cover; VJR illuminated sill plates. Lifetime, annual contributors, and 23 year members of National Corvette Museum. Home is the beautiful Pacific Northwest.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Klinn View Post
                Good article, and thanks for posting the link. One tidbit I found interesting:



                Reducing the "teeter-totter" effect can have some negative side effects.
                1. When pushing the car hard, drivers depend on the feeling of pitch & dive to give them immediate feedback on how the car is performing and how close to the limits they are. If you had zero sensations of this type it would be like playing a video game, you would have to depend on your eyes for feedback instead of feeling it with your body. So let's hope that while teeter-tottering may be reduced, there's enough left to provide useful feedback.
                2. For similar reasons I predict some people will complain that the car doesn't "feel fast". That is, they don't get the same feeling of the car squatting under hard acceleration. Despite the numbers proving otherwise, they'll insist that it just doesn't feel as good.
                Good points. I felt like the C7 steering gave me much less feedback than my C5. Likewise I expect the C8 to be more so. That said I got used to it. Although I could not feel the tires slipping like I did in the C5 there are sooooo many other things that the C7 does better.

                Also I have had the chance to drive some mid rear engine super cars. Also I did the Cayman S on the Porsche Atlanta experience center. There are many advantages to this new positioning of the engine. However we should not expect it to handle like our front engine cars if you track. Street? I doubt you will have any issues. Track, you need to be prepared that when do break loose the rear it will tend to come around on you more.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Klinn View Post
                  Good article, and thanks for posting the link. One tidbit I found interesting:



                  Reducing the "teeter-totter" effect can have some negative side effects.
                  1. When pushing the car hard, drivers depend on the feeling of pitch & dive to give them immediate feedback on how the car is performing and how close to the limits they are. If you had zero sensations of this type it would be like playing a video game, you would have to depend on your eyes for feedback instead of feeling it with your body. So let's hope that while teeter-tottering may be reduced, there's enough left to provide useful feedback.
                  2. For similar reasons I predict some people will complain that the car doesn't "feel fast". That is, they don't get the same feeling of the car squatting under hard acceleration. Despite the numbers proving otherwise, they'll insist that it just doesn't feel as good.
                  In previous photos I have seen a gauge on the dash for "G Forces!" The reduced sensation from this so called "teeter totter" effect are certainly augmented by the effects of "back and forth" from G Forces! This seems analogous to the necessary sensations of ride effect (to coin a phrase). I think a driver will have more then adequate, and telling, excitement from sensation.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 68roadster View Post

                    Interesting. Well you know people love to have something to complain about, so count on it not feeling good to them.
                    Just replace the stock springs with some from a Cadillac and you can make it squat as much as you want.
                    Delivered 5/29!: Scarlet Fever 2021 2LT HTC, Red Mist Metallic Tintcoat, two-tone Natural w/ suede inserts, Mag Ride, Performance Exhaust

                    Current C7: SunKissed, 2015 2LT, 7MT, Black overDaytona Sunrise Orange Metallic, Stingray convertible

                    Proud member of the Old Dominion Corvette Club: https://www.olddominioncorvetteclub.org/

                    Never grow up - It's a trap.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by John View Post
                      Thank you Shepherd777. I talked with Don at the Reveal. He was genuine excited about what he was seeing (as we 98% of us, e.g., on the moon).
                      Thy're talking about the new GM networking architecture, which could conceivably require a 48 volt electrical system, but no one has said so. But GM announced this architecture a while ago, is using it on some Cadillacs as well as the C8, and there's not been one word about a 48 volt system. I find it hard to believe they wouldn't have mentioned this by now if it were true. But I guess we'll find out eventually.

                      Here are some articles about it, none of which mention 48 volts.

                      https://media.gm.com/media/us/en/gm/...0-digital.html

                      https://www.reuters.com/article/us-a...0P42UY20150624

                      Delivered 5/29!: Scarlet Fever 2021 2LT HTC, Red Mist Metallic Tintcoat, two-tone Natural w/ suede inserts, Mag Ride, Performance Exhaust

                      Current C7: SunKissed, 2015 2LT, 7MT, Black overDaytona Sunrise Orange Metallic, Stingray convertible

                      Proud member of the Old Dominion Corvette Club: https://www.olddominioncorvetteclub.org/

                      Never grow up - It's a trap.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Klinn View Post
                        Good article, and thanks for posting the link. One tidbit I found interesting:



                        Reducing the "teeter-totter" effect can have some negative side effects.
                        1. When pushing the car hard, drivers depend on the feeling of pitch & dive to give them immediate feedback on how the car is performing and how close to the limits they are. If you had zero sensations of this type it would be like playing a video game, you would have to depend on your eyes for feedback instead of feeling it with your body. So let's hope that while teeter-tottering may be reduced, there's enough left to provide useful feedback.
                        2. For similar reasons I predict some people will complain that the car doesn't "feel fast". That is, they don't get the same feeling of the car squatting under hard acceleration. Despite the numbers proving otherwise, they'll insist that it just doesn't feel as good.
                        When I was a 16 year old in 1963, I had a cousin who shoe horned a 327 V8 into a 54 Chevy with over 100K miles on it. No other mods to springs, shocks wheels or tires, no sway bars, no nothing that car had plenty of pitch and dive. Going 60 mph felt like going 100 mph.

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