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Reveal Countdown Clock! Official 4/26 GM C8 News. Finally, 7.18.19 Orange County Reveal Location Is Announced!

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What dealers get the C8

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  • What dealers get the C8

    Will there be a list of what dealers sell the C8. I know they need to send people out to be educated on the car to be able to sell. Just wondering

  • #2
    I doubt there will be a list...first year is always crazy....
    as the years pass some of the smaller dealers get corvettes for showroom jewelry.

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    • #3
      Sorry but there is no short answer to your question, soo here goes, and I am truly simplifying things to get to at least a 95% answer to your question.

      As of now, GM has not publicly announced that C8 sales will be limited to any specific amount of dealers (e.g., only to the top 1,000 of them only). I believe that they have neither made such an announcement internally and directly to its dealers, so over time, my best guess is that every one of GM’s +3,000 dealers would be able to order and receive a C8.

      Sales of C8 will be awarded primarily based on three factors:

      1) Absolute initial requirement: Dealer must qualify for one of the two paths listed here.

      https://www.midenginecorvetteforum.c...s-requirements

      2) Second is the issue of supply and demand versus initial dealer allocations:

      GM will, as they always do when there is excessive demand vs supply, prioritize sales to those dealers who have sold the most amount of Corvettes in a GM predetermined, earlier time period. Sometimes that is a one year time period; sometimes a different reference base time period.

      Whatever that base time period is, GM like many other OEMs, rewards those who have made them the most profit through those earlier sales, e.g., the old “you turn, you earn.”

      For instance in the first week of production, while GM might give its top dealers a large amount of C8 allocations, smaller dealers would probably not get even one of their orders accepted in week one, maybe not even in month one. My local dealer who has sold less than ten Corvettes this year told me that he doubts he will get more than one C8 (“if that” )in the first few months of C8 production.

      Conversely, at the very end of a generation, when demand is less than production capability (except right now for the limited production ZR1), every dealer can get every order with every option accepted the first consensus that they submit it for.

      However even when at the beginning of a generation or a model, that does not mean that GM will keep building 100% of its C8’s for only its top ten or even top 25, or even its top 100 dealers while blowing off dealers 101 and lower. It will be a referencing and sequential process. I have the 7 page document that GM uses to determine allocations, and even with my taking a few college math courses, I gave up in the middle of page 3 trying to follow it.

      3) The issue of color or option constraints. Even more complex that awarding of new C8 allocations, is the usual Interplay of constrained options. Once again those dealers who have sold the most Corvettes in the reference base time period, will be preferentially awarded those constrained options.

      Options are constrained for primarily three reasons. First, a supplier might not be able to keep up with the number of customer chosen pink armrests, or second, that supplier made have made a batch of 250 of them, but GM rejected all but 25 or them for quality control reasons. Thirdly, GM’s projected take rate for an option, through this is usually at the being of a new gen or a new model, is less than the number of customer who wanted it. Best example here is the + 40% of ZR1 buyers choosing Sebring Orange. While “more paint” can be more easily be ordered and received than most options, what if GM were to have underestimated the number of visible carbon fiber aero package A components — where those parts are hand assembled and thus gearing up for much greater orders than originally projected is a more difficult situation to overcome, to catch up on.

      Again of course using hypothetical numbers, let us say that GM’s supplier only has the capability to make 2,000 sets of the 5-Trident wheels per month, but surprise to GM, instead of a 50% customer ordering/take rate it estimated, customers choose that wheel by a 75% rate. A constraint on that option occurs for the next consensus. Let us assume it is constrained identically to those numbers, so it is constrained at a 67%% rate, meaning nationally during the next consensus 2 out of 3 orders which have those wheels, would be accepted, but 1 in 3 would be rejected.

      Again in such circumstances, GM rewards its top selling dealers, so perhaps the top three dealers of Kerbeck, MacMulkin, and Criswell, get 100% of their orders for those 5-Trident wheels, but a dealer who only sold 20 Corvettes last year and yet also had half of its customers that consensus want that wheel, might only get one order with the 5-Tridents accepted, or maybe not even that one order during that consensus.

      Considering that in the time period a couple of months right after C7’s orders were initially accepted for production, that there were for some weeks’ consensus as many of 5-10 constrained items, one can see that it is a very complex process for getting a specific order, with specific colors and options, accepted for production in any consensus (where acceptance is status 2000 — which means that GM has formally accepted that order and will produce it with all of its desired colors/options/specs).

      Hence, for all the above, predicting who will get orders accepted when, and whether that dealer’s orders will have any constraints, a few, or a bunch of them is right now impossible to predict.

      ​​​However, putting all the above factors together, during times where demand exceeds supply, the bigger Corvette selling dealer you place your order with, the more likelihood your order would be accepted in any consensus.
      Last edited by John; 05-14-2019, 05:12 PM.
      Excited owners of a 2015 Z06. Lifetime, annual contributors, and 20 year members of NCM. Our 2020 ME C8 Corvette is next.

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      • #4
        Are the first batches of ME C8 going to be equipped at the discretion of GM or where does the ordering process fit?

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        • #5
          Darn good question. Everyone will be customer-specifically ordered except for one of the first batch — which GM will keep and place in its Heritage Center Collection and thus the way GM wants it to look. However, there could be two exceptions to this.

          1) If GM chooses, as they did for the C7, to start out the C8’s run with a Special Edition, they will spec them out and all of those SE’s will be the same. Here’s a C7’s Premiere Edition reveal video



          http://www.corvetteblogger.com/2013/...rvette-museum/

          2) If a dealer chooses to instead of filling a customer order, order one for itself for its showroom (show and tell and later sale), they could do that, but as GM prioritizes customer sold orders over dealer stock orders, that dealer could “lose its place” in the early ordering process.
          Excited owners of a 2015 Z06. Lifetime, annual contributors, and 20 year members of NCM. Our 2020 ME C8 Corvette is next.

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          • #6
            Really more complex then I thought

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