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Corvette Today Podcast: Latest Corvette News And Headlines

Things are starting to heat up about the new C8 Z06! And CORVETTE TODAY covers it all in this News & Headlines episode. Here are some of the topics you'll hear about ...
1. Final stats for the 2021 model year C8 Corvette
2. Nearly half of the C8.R IMSA Edition C8’s are already sold
3. 2022 C8 Configurator is now live
4. The C8 was the 2nd fastest selling new car in August 2021
5. Consumer Reports declines to recommend the 2021 C8 Corvette
6. 2021 C8 tops its class in the JD Power APEAL Study
7. A Nurburgring video captures 2023 C8 Z06 with unofficial track time
8. We have video evidence that the C8 Z06 will also come in an HTC
9. Did we see the reveal colors on the last teaser video for the C8 Z06?
10. Another Easter Egg discovery on the C8 Z06 “Save the Date” video
11. Spy photos of the C8 E-ray confirm it’s a performance hybrid
12. New Zealand about to get their right-hand drive C8 Corvettes
13. The C8 Z06 might break 3 production V8 records
14. Chevrolet has officially quit making the LT5 engine with 755 hp

This is a long list of topics, and it's not everything that's covered in this episode of the CORVETTE TODAY podcast.

Listen Here: https://adori.page.link/corvette-today
Website & Merchandise: www.CorvetteTodayPodcast.com
Get CORVETTE TODAY email notifications: https://CorvetteToday.ck.page
Join the CORVETTE TODAY Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2718423201763136
Watch CORVETTE TODAY on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXCRn-2X0SjjEXUt_...
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The C8 Really has an Bodywork Integrated Spoiler???

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  • The C8 Really has an Bodywork Integrated Spoiler???

    One Question: THE SPOILER SEEN ON THE PROTOTYPES?????

    The 8 camoCars have the ugly spoiler, awkward spoiler ----- unless one thinks it adorable. Bolted or glued on camospoilers on the C8 prototypes?

    The spoiler on the Camo C8s: Is it real or just camo. For example, the Mclarens have spoilers integrated into the bodywork. And also , the C8 CAD drawings show, what looks like, bodywork integrated spoilers.

    Which one does the C8 really have: An integrated bodywork spoiler or a bolted on spoiler. If it is strictly just a part of the disguise that the C8s have the spoilers that they do have at this time, then that makes sense. Especially so if it hides an bodywork integrated spoiler.

    Or is it not worth figuring out since we will know in 10 weeks.



    Click image for larger version  Name:	images.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	11.0 KB ID:	34615Click image for larger version  Name:	images.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	13.5 KB ID:	34616
    Last edited by SheepDog; 05-01-2019, 03:07 PM.

  • #2
    That would be an awesome bonus having active aero

    Comment


    • #3
      Strange as it may sound, I think an integrated/active spoiler would sell enough cars on its own to require that second BGA shift. That’s a crowd pleaser to be sure.
      2019 Z06: M7 Coupe: Shadow Gray Metallic
      2016 Sting w/Z51 : M7 Coupe : Night Race Blue

      Comment


      • #4
        Unfortunately, I'm of the impression that the typical Corvette buyer has no idea what 'active aero' is. It is certainly something that will appeal to the market that Corvette is targeting with the new ME. What really amazes me is all the 'stuff' that so many are expecting will be packed into a $65K sports car. As noted above, we'll see in 10 weeks.....
        2020 HTC Torch Red with lots of goodies. Built in September. Museum Delivered in October......

        Other toys in the garage: Ferrari California, BMW i8 Roadster, Bentley Flying Spur

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        • #5
          Fun speculating in the interim. Though just thinking it must be time to see some more ILW pictures and videos. Maybe tomorrow?
          GBA Black; HTO Twilight/Tension interior; Z51 & Mag Ride; E60 lift; 5VM visible carbon fiber package; 5ZZ high wing; FA5 interior vis CF; ZZ3 engine appearance; 3LT; Q8T Spectra Gray Tridents; J6N Edge Red Calipers; SNG Edge Red Hashmarks; VQK Splash Guards; RCC Edge Red engine cover; VJR illuminated sill plates. Lifetime, annual contributors, and 23 year members of National Corvette Museum. Home is the beautiful Pacific Northwest.

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          • #6
            There's a reason cars like McLaren, Ferrari, etc. have more integrated bodywork and few visible seams, while Corvettes have bolt on parts, visible mold lines, and obvious seams where separate parts are attached. That reason is cost. Manufacturing the very complex shapes that the integrated designs have is simply more expensive. Potentially much more expensive.

            Which is the reason why the spoilers on the C8 will continue to be separate bolt on pieces.
            Delivered 5/29!: Scarlet Fever 2021 2LT HTC, Red Mist Metallic Tintcoat, two-tone Natural w/ suede inserts, Mag Ride, Performance Exhaust

            Gone but not forgotten: SunKissed, 2015 2LT, 7MT, Black over Daytona Sunrise Orange Metallic, Stingray convertible

            Proud member of the Old Dominion Corvette Club: https://www.olddominioncorvetteclub.org/

            Never grow up - It's a trap.

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            • #7
              I would prefer a "ducktail" spoiler / wickerbill / integrated. The mule wing is...goofy. If that is the standard one, I'm sure a nice CF Duckbill from the aftermarket would follow soon.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by meyerweb View Post
                There's a reason cars like McLaren, Ferrari, etc. have more integrated bodywork and few visible seams, while Corvettes have bolt on parts, visible mold lines, and obvious seams where separate parts are attached. That reason is cost. Manufacturing the very complex shapes that the integrated designs have is simply more expensive. Potentially much more expensive.

                Which is the reason why the spoilers on the C8 will continue to be separate bolt on pieces.
                I hear that. But creativity in design makes the difficult easier and less expensive. I will pray that the C8 designers are as smart as I am poor. If they are then it will work out.

                Comment


                • #9
                  GM has experienced some warranty issues and more than a couple of complaints about the C7’s panel fit. Corvette has shown that wherever possible, they listen well to its customers. Expect to see a few examples of that in the C8.

                  We all hope that panel to panel fit is one of those improvements. I was surprised when my Master Body Shop Tech (40 years in the business), when trying to tighten and uneven gap on the joint between the fender and the rear fascia, showed me that they are not two inner flanges that could be tightened one against the other to reduce the gap. We hope; we hope that C8 has a better panel adjustment method.
                  GBA Black; HTO Twilight/Tension interior; Z51 & Mag Ride; E60 lift; 5VM visible carbon fiber package; 5ZZ high wing; FA5 interior vis CF; ZZ3 engine appearance; 3LT; Q8T Spectra Gray Tridents; J6N Edge Red Calipers; SNG Edge Red Hashmarks; VQK Splash Guards; RCC Edge Red engine cover; VJR illuminated sill plates. Lifetime, annual contributors, and 23 year members of National Corvette Museum. Home is the beautiful Pacific Northwest.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Does it have anything to do with facilitation of modding that Stingray panels are as they are. https://youtu.be/hHkQgVX6MZM








                    Could not resist this pic from the ACS stuff. Did not susceed with he URL upload.
                    The panel fits are probably a design function.




                    89SHARESWidebody Kits Put Huge Tread On Your C7 Corvette Stingray


                    By ANDY BOLIG JULY 07, 2018
                    Everyone enjoys when their car has more power. Truth is, as the horsepower under the hoods of Corvettes has increased, the limiting factor has become how to get all that additional horsepower to the pavement. Even in base model form, the Stingray Corvette’s stock LT1 puts out 460 horsepower and is capable of some serious acceleration. Any speed parts added will only reduce the hope that your rear tires have when trying to get a grip. Plus, let’s just face it, enthusiasts are always looking for ways to upgrade their cars and set them apart from the bone stock crowd.

                    One way to do that is by utilizing components from upgraded models to “upgrade” your own ride. Many components are available from Chevrolet that will fit “lesser equipped” models and can be ordered directly through a local dealer. Doing things this way, you retain the factory quality level within the components and fitment shouldn’t be an issue.

                    Getting more tire will not only help performance, it’ll look great also!

                    One of the issues with doing something like a “widebody kit” on a C7 Stingray Corvette by using Grand Sport or Z06 components is that the wider rear quarter panels were designed to match up with Z06 or Grand Sport-specific rocker panels. That means to mate everything together, you’ll need to remove the rocker panels.

                    As the C7 Corvette moves down the assembly line, the rocker panel is the first exterior body panel the assembly plant bonds to the hydro-formed, aluminum chassis using a calibrated fixture. The lower rocker panel is the foundation of the C7 Corvette and all other panels are built around this one. That means to remove and install a new rocker panel involves removing the doors, as well as the entire rear panel assembly. Installing the new lower rocker panel is done using an application-specific urethane adhesive and correct positioning is paramount because doors, fenders and quarter panels all need to line up properly to this panel.

                    A Simpler Solution

                    While upgrading everything to widebody status using all GM parts is quite labor-intensive, many folks might consider the upgrade if it weren’t for the additional steps with the rocker panels. That is where the aftermarket really begins to shine. Zip Products has worked with Advanced Composite Specialties(ACS Composite) to make several kits available to Corvette owners that do not require removal of the factory rocker panels. This is done by providing a panel that mates the stock rocker with the additional width of the new quarter panels. Thankfully, the doors do not have to be removed nor the rocker panels.

                    Installation time is greatly reduced, thanks to not dealing with the doors and rockers, but other benefits of the kit are that each kit is a true bolt-on conversion, there is no cutting or grinding required. The rocker panel extension is bolted on (some drilling necessary) to make up the difference between the stock rocker and the wider rear quarters and the kit can typically be installed within a day.

                    The ACS-designed quarter panels work with the factory rocker panels and rear fascia by utilizing filler panels front and rear. Some drilling is required to mount them but removal of the factory rocker panel is avoided.
                    ACS Composite describes the conversion from stock Stingray to widebody as, “more of a lengthy install than it is a difficult one.” All in all, it is greatly simplified by retaining the stock rocker panels. Zip Products offers several kits for 2014-2019 Corvettes, whether coupes or convertibles. There are also kits for those who might want Z06-style cooling ducts or the factory appearing, smooth-sided Stingray style.

                    Kits are available for coupes (left) and convertibles (right) and can be ordered with either Z06-style brake ducts or smooth sided.
                    Of course, since you’re considering modifying the body of your Corvette, you may also want to consider one of the various styles of side skirts, front splitters, rear spoilers or a variety of other items that will help differentiate your car from the rest. The widebody kit includes everything you need to “stretch” the rear of your base model Corvette – making it possible to get those factory 20 x 12-inch wheels or even custom 20 x 13-inch (from the likes of CCW or Forgeline) inside the fenders.

                    Panel Construction

                    The ACS Composite-fabricated panels used in the C7 Corvette widebody kits are manufactured using RTM (Resin Transfer Molding) technology, which combines a mix of vinyl-ester resins and continuous fiberglass. The process involves being injected into a mold and then compressed under high pressure. The result is a rigid, durable, and smooth panel that is simple to work with and ideal for cosmetic automotive add-ons.

                    ACS Composite’s Joseph Taverna explains the difference between their RTM panels and the factory, “GM uses SMC on the Corvette panels, and from a functional perspective, both procedures yield identical results. ACS’s RTM manufacturing process has been validated to meet and exceed GM’s durability standard and has been used for various OEM programs destined for GM. The benefit of RTM applies mainly on ACS Composite’s end, where the panels are easier to work with and we can fine-tune the final product for a perfect fit and finish.”
                    We firmly believe that our products go on the car without needing to alter the product in any shape or form; a final sanding, and then painting is all that is required. – Joseph Taverna, ACS Composite
                    The RTM process creates a panel that is smooth on both sides with a consistent thickness across the entire surface. The controlled fiberglass/resin composition of RTM reduces cure times and eliminates the possibility of “wet” parts being removed from the mold prematurely. Once fully cured, panels are then trimmed using a CNC robotic water-jet for a clean, smooth cut on every part, resulting in a better fitting panel.

                    Zip offers bolt-on widebody kits for both convertibles and coupes.
                    Fitment is key, as the panels are designed using GM OEM data, meaning nothing was hand-modeled on the car. It was all done through digital designing and to the exact specification of the C7 Corvette. This limits the variance in the final fitment from car to car. This benefits the end user with reduced install time and they don’t need to do extra modifications not only to the car, but the product itself. Joseph explains, “We firmly believe that our products go on the car without needing to alter the product in any shape or form; a final sanding, and then painting is all that is required.”

                    ACS Composite also offers a complete rear “clip” that features wider rear quarter panels and a matching fascia for those who want the entire package. Rear spoilers, front splitters and side skirts give your C7 the “aero package.”

                    All body panels will need to be painted to match your car, but accessory components you might choose to accent your wider ride, such as spoilers, splitters or side skirts can be had in a variety of finishes. If you are wanting to have the parts painted, primer is the best choice and requires a final sanding prior to paint. Carbon Flash Metallic Black is the general recommendation for all products on a C7 Corvette. This color will match the trim pieces already found on your C7 including the front grill, rear diffuser and fender inserts. Essentially, all black accent pieces are in Carbon Flash Metallic Black.

                    What Do You Get?

                    The complete package includes everything needed for a factory-style conversion, including RTM rear quarters, fender extensions, inner fender liners, and quarter ducts, everything you need to “stretch” the rear of your base model Corvette. The upgrade brings an added 40mm width on either side, allowing room for wheels with 335-25-20 tires.



                    With that additional rubber out back, each one of those 460 ponies under the hood of your Stingray may find it a lot harder to make smoke. You’ll enjoy the improved traction when you need it most, and your Corvette will look great from any angle, including from the rear, where competitors will see it the most. Bringing so many benefits in such a high-quality offering, the biggest issue you might have is determining which options you may want on your car and what color combination will tie it all together.
                    Last edited by SheepDog; 05-02-2019, 04:20 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      ACS Composites is outstanding. Have several parts on my Z06 as do my friends on theirs. First place I will be looking for aftermarket parts of the kind they sell is them, and for engine compartment and similar “interior” parts, going back to Showstopper.
                      GBA Black; HTO Twilight/Tension interior; Z51 & Mag Ride; E60 lift; 5VM visible carbon fiber package; 5ZZ high wing; FA5 interior vis CF; ZZ3 engine appearance; 3LT; Q8T Spectra Gray Tridents; J6N Edge Red Calipers; SNG Edge Red Hashmarks; VQK Splash Guards; RCC Edge Red engine cover; VJR illuminated sill plates. Lifetime, annual contributors, and 23 year members of National Corvette Museum. Home is the beautiful Pacific Northwest.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Good point. A bolt on spoiler that you don't like can probably be replaced with an aftermarket one. A fully integrated one you're stuck with.
                        Delivered 5/29!: Scarlet Fever 2021 2LT HTC, Red Mist Metallic Tintcoat, two-tone Natural w/ suede inserts, Mag Ride, Performance Exhaust

                        Gone but not forgotten: SunKissed, 2015 2LT, 7MT, Black over Daytona Sunrise Orange Metallic, Stingray convertible

                        Proud member of the Old Dominion Corvette Club: https://www.olddominioncorvetteclub.org/

                        Never grow up - It's a trap.

                        Comment

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