Adnimation ATF

Collapse

MECF_728x90_top

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

"winterize" question

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • "winterize" question

    I live in Texas, no need to winterize. baby will be covered with maintainer for my knee replacement in January. I will get her started and let run every couple days.

    my question is, does it really get that bad where you're at to just lock it up for 3-4 months?

  • #2
    I would suggest a very different program for starting up the car and not bringing all of its including its trans up to full temp is not good for it. Better imo for you to leave it on a battery maintainer and not start it up at all for several month.
    GBA Black; HTO Twilight/Tension interior; Z51 & Mag Ride; E60 lift; 5VM visible carbon fiber package; 5ZZ high wing; FA5 interior vis CF; ZZ3 engine appearance; 3LT; Q8T Spectra Gray Tridents; J6N Edge Red Calipers; SNG Edge Red Hashmarks; VQK Splash Guards; RCC Edge Red engine cover; VJR illuminated sill plates. Lifetime, annual contributors, and 23 year members of National Corvette Museum. Home is the beautiful Pacific Northwest.

    Comment


    • #3
      I'd only worry about starting it up if where you park the vehicle is ++++ dry and even then, only if the vehicle is sitting for many months. My mechanic father taught me that seals and gaskets can dry out under those circumstances so starting up the vehicle will "lubricate" them and better prevent them from getting dry and shrinking/cracking and developing leaks. However if you do start up a vehicle, as John said it's good to get the temperature up to where it's at with normal use...and NOT simply start it up and run it for a few minutes so it's not truly hot.

      The only caveat I'll place on the above: I was taught this decades ago and perhaps (?) vehicles these days are set up differently. Maybe someone with more current knowledge can chime in and verify if the above holds true for "modern engines".

      Comment


      • #4
        We are long past rubber or cork seals/gaskets. I do not know the properties of current seals/gaskets but my guess is that none would even start to dry up at six months. But as you noted netsinah, anyone know for sure?
        GBA Black; HTO Twilight/Tension interior; Z51 & Mag Ride; E60 lift; 5VM visible carbon fiber package; 5ZZ high wing; FA5 interior vis CF; ZZ3 engine appearance; 3LT; Q8T Spectra Gray Tridents; J6N Edge Red Calipers; SNG Edge Red Hashmarks; VQK Splash Guards; RCC Edge Red engine cover; VJR illuminated sill plates. Lifetime, annual contributors, and 23 year members of National Corvette Museum. Home is the beautiful Pacific Northwest.

        Comment


        • #5
          I live in Illinois and the longest my Car sits is 3 months, 4 if its a really a Snowy Winter. What keeps my Car Covered in the Garage is Rock-Salt and Debris caused by Winterizing the Roads. If it’s bad enough to harm the paint, I don’t bother because I have plenty of driving options.

          I also don’t go over the top with Fuel Additives or Winterizing my Car because it’s always ready to go on a nice cool days where the roads good. It’s always plugged in, tires filled and ready to hit the road.
          1999 C5 Magnetic Red Coupe -Z51 - SOLD 7/31/21
          2021 C8 Red Mist Z51 HTC, 2LT Mag Ride & Front Lift

          Carbon Flash Top/Mirrors/AH Splitter & Skirts, STD Silver Wheels
          GT2 2-Tone Seats Sky Cool Grey/Black

          Delivered – August 28th @ The National Corvette Museum

          Comment


          • #6
            Living in Vermont...with newer technology as far as seals and gaskets there's no need to worry about those things. Fuel stabilizer is a good idea as most seasonal vehicles will sit around for about 6 months up here and a battery tender as well. Those things are important and a must. If the vehicle is kept in a garage that's about all you need to do. Some guys will get those wheel chucks that prevent flat spots on the tires but I have never had an issue with that. Tire technology is way better than it used to be.

            Comment


            • #7
              thank you, guys,

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by John View Post
                We are long past rubber or cork seals/gaskets. I do not know the properties of current seals/gaskets but my guess is that none would even start to dry up at six months. But as you noted netsinah, anyone know for sure?
                Not sure of the specific properties of the crankshaft seals, but I do know that they are installed dry (no lube is to be applied to the sealing surfaces). They are a reverse lip design and are not the same as the old rubber seals with a band spring.

                We used to see the rear seal "stick" to the crankshaft on older big block Motorhomes. Often times these Motorhomes would sit for years and it was not uncommon for the owner to install fresh batteries, try to start it and have the rotating crankshaft tear the seal out. I wouldn't worry about something like that happening on a C8 though, especially after only sitting for a few months. Basically it's old tech vs new tech.

                On my own vehicles that are sitting for extended periods of time, I do try to take them on the occasional test drive weather permitting. Main thing is bring everything up to normal operating temperature.

                Comment


                • #9
                  And when you do start it up and allow it to get to normal operating temps, please remember to open your garage doors! 😂

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    With my 3 vehicles, I take one at a time OFF insurance and lay it up for up to 16 months. Stored in an unheated garage with concrete floor, with Stal-Bil in a full tank, on battery maintainer. Never had a problem restarting and putting them back on the road, no fluid leaks. I even stored my motorhome with a 454 Chevy this way, except no battery maintainer on it, for 10 years and just had to buy a new battery to put it back on the road. Never started them, just kept the tires inflated above normal pressures.

                    EDIT: I forgot to add that I change the oil and filter when I put it in storage and do not change it before I put it back on the road. Just reset the Oil Life monitor because the oil has never been used.
                    Last edited by 2020Colorado; 11-25-2021, 11:40 AM.
                    2020 1LT |Torch Red/Black | MSRP $59,995 | DOB=8/31 | Home on 9/24.
                    Splash Guards, Cargo Nets, All weather Jake Floor Mats and Cargo Area Liner, and Front Grille Screens behind grilles.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks for the reminder about tires above normal PSI. When I stored even my extra sets of tires, they were always aired up to 40 PSI before they went into hibernation. Never had a flat spotting issue when their sleep was over and they returned to service mega months later.
                      GBA Black; HTO Twilight/Tension interior; Z51 & Mag Ride; E60 lift; 5VM visible carbon fiber package; 5ZZ high wing; FA5 interior vis CF; ZZ3 engine appearance; 3LT; Q8T Spectra Gray Tridents; J6N Edge Red Calipers; SNG Edge Red Hashmarks; VQK Splash Guards; RCC Edge Red engine cover; VJR illuminated sill plates. Lifetime, annual contributors, and 23 year members of National Corvette Museum. Home is the beautiful Pacific Northwest.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If you listen to the Mobil 1 tech at any Corvette function, he will tell you to change the oil before storage and just before bringing the vehicle back into operation. His recommendation is based on condensation building in the oil crankcase over storage in a location that is not climate controlled! I always remind him of the worst thing anybody can do is to idle their car during storage which only creates more condensation. My rule of thumb is to never operate the car after any storage period without a drive of at least 15 miles. That way, the engine and exhaust system will have come to full operating temperature and evacuated or burnt all existing condensation from the engine and exhaust system. Other previous suggestions to store your vehicle with a full tank of stabilized fuel, 40 psi in your tires, and a battery maintainer, I also concur.
                        GD0 Accelerate Yellow Metallic; 3LT; HUE Natural Napa Leather; AE4 Competition Sport Seats; FA5 CF Interior Trim; Z51; FE4 Mag Ride Suspension; E60 Front Lift; Q8Q CF Open Spoke Wheels; J6F BR Brembo Calipers; RCC ER Intake Cover; DTH CF Racing Stripes; ZZ3 Engine App Package; VQK Splash Guards; ERI Battery Protection; R8C Museum Delivery

                        Proud LTM NCM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by whl3 View Post
                          If you listen to the Mobil 1 tech at any Corvette function, he will tell you to change the oil before storage and just before bringing the vehicle back into operation.
                          The second half of that seem geared more towards selling oil than anything else. Once you start the car up and get it to normal operating temps, the water that has condensed into the oil is going to vaporize and evaporate.
                          Delivered 5/29!: Scarlet Fever 2021 2LT HTC, Red Mist Metallic Tintcoat, two-tone Natural w/ suede inserts, Mag Ride, Performance Exhaust

                          Gone but not forgotten: SunKissed, 2015 2LT, 7MT, Black over Daytona Sunrise Orange Metallic, Stingray convertible

                          Proud member of the Old Dominion Corvette Club: https://www.olddominioncorvetteclub.org/

                          Never grow up - It's a trap.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by meyerweb View Post

                            The second half of that seem geared more towards selling oil than anything else. Once you start the car up and get it to normal operating temps, the water that has condensed into the oil is going to vaporize and evaporate.
                            I agree. Come Spring, I just re-set the remaining oi life indicator to 100%. Fresh, clean oil in an unstarted engine in a 45 degree dry garage does not deteriorate to 60% by just sitting in the dry sump tank over 4 winter months.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              John, et al, so you're in agreement that, even for 2-3 month storage (in an unheated garage), that setting each tire to 40psi is a good idea? I do NOT plan to add STABIL to the gas tank as I have not read in my OM that GM recommends that....(or, did I miss it?)....Thanks, TC

                              Comment

                              MECF_728x90_bottom

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X