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  • C8 Maintenance

    Was having a conversation with a former mechanic the other day and we started discussing the C8 now being a mid-engine. He used to work on ME Ferrari's and Lambo's and was just thinking out loud about how this new design could significantly increase the maintenance costs of the Corvette. Simple things like changing the oil may now be things that need to be done at the dealerships and any major work could involve removing the body to get to the area of the engine that will need work. Didn't see this discussed on any other threads, so just wanted to throw this out there for discussion.

    Any thoughts on ME maintenance challenges and costs compared to the FE?

  • #2
    Traditionally GM is superior in designing ease of maintaince than most italian or other european vehicle manufacturers.

    ease of maintaince is a warranty related item and gm is aware of its projected cost structures.

    major maintaince will require engine drops but thats really nothing new. Previous and existing corvettes do tend to require front bumper, radiator and steering rack removals. Clutch replacements with properly dropping the torque tube will obviously be a thing of the past.

    having put 132k miles on my purchased new c6 z51 manual has been so light im not expecting dramatcially increased costs of servie on the c8.

    interesting topic.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Fireeagle View Post
      ...Simple things like changing the oil may now be things that need to be done at the dealerships...
      Specific to normal maintenance, I enjoy working on my Vettes, and always change my own oil.

      There have been way too many dealership oil overfill stories out there with the C7.

      Unless GM places a power-train warranty requirement on dealership oil changes, I'll be doing my own C8 oil changes on my lift at home.
      My C8:
      '20 Elkhart Lake Blue 2LT Coupe, Natural Interior, GT2 Two-Tone Seats, Performance Exhaust, Front Lift, Carbon Flash Wheels, Engine Appearance Package 2000 Status December 27, 2019; 3000 Status January 2, 2020; 3400 Status March 10, 2020;TPW March 16, 2020; Built June 4th, 2020 (COVID-19); Delivery July 1, 2020

      Current Vettes:
      '68 Lemans Blue 327/350 Convertible
      '91 Turquoise Convertible with Hardtop
      '14 Lime Rock Green 2LT Convertible, Black Top, Kalahari, 7-Speed, Performance Exhaust

      Comment


      • #4
        Up until now, GM has allowed owners to do their own, but advised for the owner to do documentation, e.g., receipts for oil and filter, time dated picture of the odometer to correspond to those receipts. I am unaware of a single person who had a warranty claim denied due to doing their own oil/filter.
        GBA Black; HTO Twilight/Tension interior; Z51 & Mag Ride; E60 lift; 5VM visible carbon fiber package; 5ZZ high wing; FA5 interior vis CF; ZZ3 engine appearance; 3LT; Q8T Spectra Gray Tridents; J6N Edge Red Calipers; SNG Edge Red Hashmarks; VQK Splash Guards; RCC Edge Red engine cover; VJR illuminated sill plates. Lifetime, annual contributors, and 23 year members of National Corvette Museum. Home is the beautiful Pacific Northwest.

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        • #5
          DCT transmissions typically require more frequent fluid changes than either automatics or manuals. Absent bottom aero covers, I see no special oil change issues, but would likely require the entire car be put on a lift. Home oil changes with a jack or ramps, less practical. But when the DOHC engine comes out, particularly the twin turbo version, I see a more aggressive maintenance schedule, and if its a "hot vee", heat related oil leak or other issues not present in a ohv small block based engine.

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          • #6
            Somewhere on here there's a photo of a C8 in a parking lot with the rear hatch open. The hatch is HUGE. There should be pretty easy access to the bits underneath. Obviously some things on the engine will be harder to reach, just because the rear of the car is so wide, but I would expect fluid reservoirs and maybe the air filter to be located near the sides for easy access. Spark plugs last for 100K miles these days. so you won't be struggling to reach those. On the bottom, unless the entire underbody is covered (which is possible), reaching the oil drain plug(s) and filter shouldn't really be any harder on on the C7. Ditto the transaxle drain plug. It might even be possible to fill the transaxle from the top, rather than squeezing oil in from from under the car. And only one set of drain / fill plugs for a transaxle, rather than 2 for the C7's separate units.

            Even if there is a full underbody panel, I imagine it would come off with maybe a dozen fasteners, giving access to all the various maintenance locations without too much trouble.
            Delivered 5/29!: Scarlet Fever 2021 2LT HTC, Red Mist Metallic Tintcoat, two-tone Natural w/ suede inserts, Mag Ride, Performance Exhaust

            Gone but not forgotten: SunKissed, 2015 2LT, 7MT, Black over Daytona Sunrise Orange Metallic, Stingray convertible

            Proud member of the Old Dominion Corvette Club: https://www.olddominioncorvetteclub.org/

            Never grow up - It's a trap.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by John View Post
              Up until now, GM has allowed owners to do their own, but advised for the owner to do documentation, e.g., receipts for oil and filter, time dated picture of the odometer to correspond to those receipts. I am unaware of a single person who had a warranty claim denied due to doing their own oil/filter.
              I think the Feds have ruled that a manufacturer can't require you to use their dealers for service unless they're providing that service for free.

              Ah, here it is: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/article...maintenance#do

              Do I have to use the dealer for repairs and maintenance to keep my warranty in effect?

              No. An independent mechanic, a retail chain shop, or even you yourself can do routine maintenance and repairs on your vehicle. In fact, the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, which is enforced by the FTC, makes it illegal for manufacturers or dealers to claim that your warranty is void or to deny coverage under your warranty simply because someone other than the dealer did the work. The manufacturer or dealer can, however, require consumers to use select repair facilities if the repair services are provided to consumers free of charge under the warranty.
              Delivered 5/29!: Scarlet Fever 2021 2LT HTC, Red Mist Metallic Tintcoat, two-tone Natural w/ suede inserts, Mag Ride, Performance Exhaust

              Gone but not forgotten: SunKissed, 2015 2LT, 7MT, Black over Daytona Sunrise Orange Metallic, Stingray convertible

              Proud member of the Old Dominion Corvette Club: https://www.olddominioncorvetteclub.org/

              Never grow up - It's a trap.

              Comment


              • #8
                We now know that GM is discontinuing the C7 and going 'all in' with the new C8. The risk/reward potential for this development can not be overstated. GM, of course, is betting one of their key profit center products on the decision. Will this new car create a substantially different demographic, (critical for it's success) or will it only be slight? Will the potential maintenance issues discussed above be an issue? Will luggage space be a big problem for many potential grand touring type buyers? Will the dramatic redesign be capable of achieving anything like the early success of the C7, in the face of the dramatically shifting automobile market in general?

                For all of us, it will certainly be entertaining to watch and/or take part in.

                Thanks Fireeagle, for bringing up an important point, as I don't believe that a majority of the buyers will be into doing their own maintenance.
                '64 Silver Grey Coupe (custom paint)- still our favorite
                '13 White/Blue Diamond 427 60th roadster - favorite late model
                Several others including two C7's

                '20... Zeus Bronze Coupe, 2LT, GT2 seats, Natural two tone, Body color accents, Pewter wheels- 10/1/20😀 GAME CHANGER

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                • #9
                  There may be an increased maintenance schedule as technology improvements are improved. I agree with JB that GM would take that as a factor in their design. I can't see it being that much more problematic than the current C7.
                  Rocket City Florida- 2001 ZO6 - 2013 427 Vert - 2020 Stingray

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Milliwatt Rob View Post
                    DCT transmissions typically require more frequent fluid changes than either automatics or manuals.
                    First, not all DCTs were created equal. Second, my experience with DCTs has proven the opposite. No known need to replace clutches that last much more than their "manual" counterparts. Perhaps you would like to share your sources?
                    LT2; Ceramic Gray Metallic; HTM Trim Jet Black; T19 Seat Belt Color Black; AE4 Seat Competition Sport Bucket; E60 Front Lift; Q8Q 5-open spoke Carbon Flash; FE4 Suspension Z51 Magnetic Selective Ride Control; Z51 Performance package
                    Delivered September 16, 2020

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Maxster View Post

                      First, not all DCTs were created equal. Second, my experience with DCTs has proven the opposite. No known need to replace clutches that last much more than their "manual" counterparts. Perhaps you would like to share your sources?
                      I had a 2009 Volkswagen with a DCT. Fluid changes were recommended every 40K miles. What is the basis of your opinion?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Milliwatt Rob View Post

                        I had a 2009 Volkswagen with a DCT. Fluid changes were recommended every 40K miles. What is the basis of your opinion?
                        Tracking frequently a Cayman S and currently a 4c with no maintenance requirements. Perhaps technology has made progress over that time. Remember, the Hydropneumatic system used by Ferrari in the 360 and replaced by DCTs in newer models
                        LT2; Ceramic Gray Metallic; HTM Trim Jet Black; T19 Seat Belt Color Black; AE4 Seat Competition Sport Bucket; E60 Front Lift; Q8Q 5-open spoke Carbon Flash; FE4 Suspension Z51 Magnetic Selective Ride Control; Z51 Performance package
                        Delivered September 16, 2020

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Maxster View Post

                          First, not all DCTs were created equal. Second, my experience with DCTs has proven the opposite. No known need to replace clutches that last much more than their "manual" counterparts. Perhaps you would like to share your sources?
                          Milli is correct at least wrt VW.

                          My Golf R DCT requires an oil change at 40K vs a MT at 60k. Since the clutch packs share the same oil as the trans that's not really surprising.

                          Clutches are a whole other subject with the MT Golf guys reporting all kinds of problems. The DCT guys got nothing.
                          Last edited by Bikerjulio; 04-22-2019, 07:43 PM.
                          2020 C8 Corvette.D.O.B 2/03/2020
                          Shadow Grey Metallic on Black
                          2LT, Z51 + MRC. GT1 seats.
                          Spectra Grey Tridents.
                          Carbon flash mirrors and spoiler.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by George View Post
                            We now know that GM is discontinuing the C7 and going 'all in' with the new C8. The risk/reward potential for this development can not be overstated. GM, of course, is betting one of their key profit center products on the decision. Will this new car create a substantially different demographic, (critical for it's success) or will it only be slight? Will the potential maintenance issues discussed above be an issue? Will luggage space be a big problem for many potential grand touring type buyers? Will the dramatic redesign be capable of achieving anything like the early success of the C7, in the face of the dramatically shifting automobile market in general?

                            For all of us, it will certainly be entertaining to watch and/or take part in.

                            Thanks Fireeagle, for bringing up an important point, as I don't believe that a majority of the buyers will be into doing their own maintenance.
                            Thought it would be a good conversation topic.

                            With my C7,and all of my other cars, I personally don't have the patience or inclination to do many maintenance things myself. I can relay that when I changed out the original battery in my C7, that was a real pain in the rear end I'm just thankful that the battery place I go to offers to change out the battery free of charge for most batteries. (In my case we did it together since I want to be there whenever I can for work being done on my C7. The location is great, but how tight they made the fit was a real challenge.

                            For my C4, changing batteries requires removing a side panel to get to the battery. I don't know how easy it will be with the C8 and I do hope that GM has considered accessibility for maintenance and minor repairs in their design.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I hope the battery is in a location where it is not subject to engine/exhaust heat.

                              Comment

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