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Will the c8 LT2 z51 be the only engine with dry sump oiling system?

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  • #16
    Didn’t I read on this site about a GM patent for a filter/ baffle system that is inside the oil pan- block, to stop the problem inside the engine before it gets into the intake tract,,,

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Racer86 View Post
      Didn’t I read on this site about a GM patent for a filter/ baffle system that is inside the oil pan- block, to stop the problem inside the engine before it gets into the intake tract,,,
      Yep, here it is: https://www.midenginecorvetteforum.c...8-motor-patent
      Current Vettes:
      '68 Lemans Blue 327/350 Convertible
      '91 Turquoise Convertible w/hardtop
      '14 Lime Rock Green 2LT Convertible, Black Top, Kalahari, 7-Speed, Performance Exhaust - Ordered on 4-1-2014, 2000 Status on 4-10-2014, TPW 5-12-2014, Built on 5-16-2014, Picked-up at dealership on 5-30-2014
      "Delta t = 23"

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      • #18
        In an effort to answer JB's original Q, I think all the LT2s will be dry sump. My car has had zero issues with it, so I'm fine with that decision.

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        • #19
          That was a funny post Mobius. The catch can debate again LOL.

          Actually, that is, as you noted going to be one big NO!
          So many questions about the ME right now, but the answers are nicely, though slowly, coming out.

          Excited owners of a 2015 Z06. Lifetime, annual contributors, and 20 year members of NCM. Our 2020 ME C8 Corvette is next.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Racer86 View Post
            High sustained G loading will cause a drop of oil pressure in a wet sump engine. Even high g loading throught a chicane will cause a drop of oil pressure. It’s a fact. Dry sump is the correct solution. Just touching 1 g for an instant is not hard cornering. With all due respect , most track day cars are not driven at a competitive racing speeds. Yes I know about accusump systems and trick oil pans with trap doors and baffles, but the solution is a true dry sump system. Maybe a dry sump system is not needed on a street car or even some track day cars, but that does not mean that a dry sump system is not necessary when driving at timed competitive racing events. It is. Proven fact. Your opinion may differ,
            Still, I've done hot laps (not racing, but definitely fast) on two different tracks with my wet sump C7, and oil pressure as indicated on the display we never an issue in fast or slow corners. I saw 1G indicated on the display. If you're racing, a dry sump is definitely advantageous. I doubt that on the street there are man places you can high enough cornering loads for long enough to present an issue.

            Race cars ran for decades with wet sump engines and well baffled oil pans to deal with oil starvation.
            SunKissed, my 2015 2LT, 7MT, Black over Daytona Sunrise Orange Metallic, Stingray convertible (One of about 40)

            Purchased 5/2/2015,
            >31,000+ miles

            Proud member of the Old Dominion Corvette Club. Check us out http://www.olddominioncorvetteclub.org

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            • #21
              Originally posted by meyerweb View Post

              Still, I've done hot laps (not racing, but definitely fast) on two different tracks with my wet sump C7, and oil pressure as indicated on the display we never an issue in fast or slow corners. I saw 1G indicated on the display. If you're racing, a dry sump is definitely advantageous. I doubt that on the street there are man places you can high enough cornering loads for long enough to present an issue.

              Race cars ran for decades with wet sump engines and well baffled oil pans to deal with oil starvation.
              My corvette is a wet sump amd its fine too ...i just thought next time around it would be interesting to get a corvette with the dry sump lubrication system...

              is it worth anything? Who knows...i kind of just put it on my list of wants...

              one of tje benefits if I understand this correctly is if all c8 models get a dry sump oiling system then corvette engineers can slightly lower the center of gravity. The other expectation if all c8 s have a dry sump system that the c8 even in base form is supposedly capable of extreme lateral cornering G’s....

              its actually not always the case a rear mid engine vehicle can out handle a front mid engine vehicle...from a perspective of being able to generate and hold high lateral G’s.

              And this hopefully is just fun discussion while we wait 96 more day?

              wet sumps are extemely competitive and hold very little disadvantage to a dry sump system...

              id say dry sump systems can hold a slight degree of a technological advantage supposedly on wet sump systems...

              a well designed wet sump system as in your c7 is excellent and probably lighter by a few pounds as well.
              Last edited by JB; 04-15-2019, 05:34 PM.

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              • #22
                The wet sump system in the Corvette is more of a damp sump system. It has a very simple single stage scavenging pump and pickup in the oil pan. In high G sustained cornering, oil is trapped in the pushrod valley, and cylinder head. It can’t return to the pan until the cornering load is reduced.
                So trapped oil up in the engine vee, oil pump pickup not submerged due to oil climbing up the side of the block and bingo. No or low oil pressure. If you have data acquisition which scans at a very high rate, you can see the oil pressure changing in all axis of car travel. Your gauge may not show a drop of pressure but your bearings are getting a dose of air unless you have a drysump system wth a swirl type tall oil tank . Dry sump systems have been in use in racing and aviation since at least 1920. It is the best system . I agree you might not need it for street or putting around on track days, but full on, you need it. My 4 cents, adjusted for inflation

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Racer86 View Post
                  The wet sump system in the Corvette is more of a damp sump system. It has a very simple single stage scavenging pump and pickup in the oil pan. In high G sustained cornering, oil is trapped in the pushrod valley, and cylinder head. It can’t return to the pan until the cornering load is reduced.
                  So trapped oil up in the engine vee, oil pump pickup not submerged due to oil climbing up the side of the block and bingo. No or low oil pressure. If you have data acquisition which scans at a very high rate, you can see the oil pressure changing in all axis of car travel. Your gauge may not show a drop of pressure but your bearings are getting a dose of air unless you have a drysump system wth a swirl type tall oil tank . Dry sump systems have been in use in racing and aviation since at least 1920. It is the best system . I agree you might not need it for street or putting around on track days, but full on, you need it. My 4 cents, adjusted for inflation
                  Yes it would be better....hell i still remember the owners manual video thatt came with my c5 z06 (LS6 ) that said add a half a quart of oil if you were planning on a track day.

                  ferrari puts dry sumps in all its rear mid engine v8 s and a wet sump system in its first generation ferrari california front engine cars...not sure about tje protofino though... i believe when ferrari went with twin turbos they put a dry sump in wi5 the new portofino...

                  i bet the oil pans on the upcoming rear mid engines are vastly different than on front mid engine cars as the engines are reversed? (Front to back)

                  id imagine that would be a good time to just make dry sump oiling system standard so corvette engineering could finally lower the center of gravity for all corvette c8 s?

                  We are just guessing though...

                  someone mentioned being able to lower the engine might allow for the targa top to be stored above the rear midship engine?

                  anybody still think the targa top is going to stow above the engine? No way right?

                  Would the plastic lexan roof melt? (Im kidding)

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                  • #24
                    No argument that it's better for the track. I still think it's really not necessary for the street. Doesn't mean I wouldn't want one, but I probably wouldn't pay very much extra for it.

                    i said a dry sump would allow a lower engine, and therefore a lower deck lid and better rear visibility. I agree that storing the targa top above the engine is a non-starter.
                    SunKissed, my 2015 2LT, 7MT, Black over Daytona Sunrise Orange Metallic, Stingray convertible (One of about 40)

                    Purchased 5/2/2015,
                    >31,000+ miles

                    Proud member of the Old Dominion Corvette Club. Check us out http://www.olddominioncorvetteclub.org

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by JB View Post

                      Yes it would be better....hell i still remember the owners manual video thatt came with my c5 z06 (LS6 ) that said add a half a quart of oil if you were planning on a track day.

                      ferrari puts dry sumps in all its rear mid engine v8 s and a wet sump system in its first generation ferrari california front engine cars...not sure about tje protofino though... i believe when ferrari went with twin turbos they put a dry sump in wi5 the new portofino...

                      i bet the oil pans on the upcoming rear mid engines are vastly different than on front mid engine cars as the engines are reversed? (Front to back)

                      id imagine that would be a good time to just make dry sump oiling system standard so corvette engineering could finally lower the center of gravity for all corvette c8 s?

                      We are just guessing though...

                      someone mentioned being able to lower the engine might allow for the targa top to be stored above the rear midship engine?

                      anybody still think the targa top is going to stow above the engine? No way right?

                      Would the plastic lexan roof melt? (Im kidding)
                      I’m confused, the engines in both FE and ME are in the same orientation. They are not reversed, the flywheel is on the rear of each engine, pointing to the rear of the car, no difference, or did I misunderstand what you are saying. The FE and Me dry sump oil pan can easily to the same pan. But I’m old and confuse easily the engine in the 911 is reversed compared to say a Cayman which is a midengine design.The 911 is a rear engine.

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                      • #26
                        I’m probably going to get in trouble for this,but I do wonder why someone who must have the highest horsepwered corvette for performance, would even question the need for a high performance drysump system. Just wondering,,,,,,,,,,

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Racer86 View Post

                          I’m confused, the engines in both FE and ME are in the same orientation. They are not reversed, the flywheel is on the rear of each engine, pointing to the rear of the car, no difference, or did I misunderstand what you are saying. The FE and Me dry sump oil pan can easily to the same pan. But I’m old and confuse easily the engine in the 911 is reversed compared to say a Cayman which is a midengine design.The 911 is a rear engine.
                          I was watching hoovies garage and he blew the motor in his 911 diring a track day speaking of oil starvation in his 996 911.

                          he then went threw the process of having a ls1 or ls2 into the same 911.

                          it was a fun run of building episodes to have his mechanic install the engine and its outcome.

                          he then took the chevy v8 911 on the track amd priceeded to gremade that motor. As they did the examination of the grenaded motor the tech spoke or hoovie spoke of oil starvation of the motor being the issue.

                          i believe it was stated the reversed position of the v8 in the rear of the 911 had the baffles in the oil pan exactly the same as they were in the front engine corvette they pulled the motor from....

                          if I re,ember correctly the baffles in the oil pan did not protect the engine from oil starvation on the track during track braking situations on the track before hard cornering...

                          i would suggest that preplanning proper oiling for the engine with movement to the rear of the vehicle as in 911 or boxster/cayman swaps..

                          just shooting the breeze before july 18th offical information release on the c8.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Racer86 View Post
                            My 4 cents, adjusted for inflation
                            Dam* inflation... *grumble*
                            Current Vettes:
                            '68 Lemans Blue 327/350 Convertible
                            '91 Turquoise Convertible w/hardtop
                            '14 Lime Rock Green 2LT Convertible, Black Top, Kalahari, 7-Speed, Performance Exhaust - Ordered on 4-1-2014, 2000 Status on 4-10-2014, TPW 5-12-2014, Built on 5-16-2014, Picked-up at dealership on 5-30-2014
                            "Delta t = 23"

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Mobius View Post

                              Dam* inflation... *grumble*
                              Don't know about you guys but I know I've been saying this since the 70's. So shouldn't it be more like 10 cents in todays market with inflation?

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                I was just curious if the rear mid engine c8 will be dry sump only or specifically for the z51..

                                Comment

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