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We are extremely pleased to welcome Kerbeck Corvette as a “Featured Forum Vendor.”

Kerbeck Corvettes has been the # 1 Corvette sales dealership since 1994. We are fortunate and excited that they have joined our MECF family.
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Stay Tuned As Chazcron Works On His Latest Project, The ME IP/Dashboard! Not New, But 48 Wonderful High Resolution C8 Pictures

Stay Tuned As Chazcron Works On His Latest Project, The ME IP/Dashboard! Also, High Resolution C8 Pictures!

https://www.midenginecorvetteforum.c...f-the-interior

48 High Resolution C8 Pictures:

https://www.midenginecorvetteforum.c...8-spy-pictures
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Scheduled Software Maintenance: Tuesday, 8:00 PM

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Welcome Corvette Dream Giveway As Our Forum Founding Vendor!

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What GM should do with C8 engines/fuel systems

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  • #16
    Alcohol is a mild acid. I've had to replace the carburetors on most of my small engine equipment such as weed eaters, lawn mowers, and snow blowers even though they were rated to run on E10 fuel. Since I switched to alcohol-free gasoline, I've had no further problems. A reason that E85 is cheaper at the pump is because it is being subsidized by the federal government which means we are all paying for it.
    Save the wave.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by 73shark View Post
      A reason that E85 is cheaper at the pump is because it is being subsidized by the federal government which means we are all paying for it.
      Thank you!

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Plasboy View Post

        True they can handle it to some extent but the mechanics I’ve talked to say even vehicles designed to run on E85 show some problems with corrosion when disassembled.
        Also from what I’ve read it is not really environmentally friendly as it takes huge amounts of water to produce.
        You're right to say it's a complex and controversial issue.

        A bit of a non-issue for us in Canada as it's not available anywhere.

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        • #19
          I used E85 in my Tahoe which is compliant. There was a slight improvement in performance, but fuel mileage suffered more than the cost savings. Since E85 is so difficult to obtain in SoCal, it is not practical. Maybe if availability were greater, costs would come down making it more competitive with gas. Having to fill up 30% more frequently coupled with difficulty finding E85, make it a non-starter for me.

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          • #20
            I ran an experiment in my 2010 Tahoe several years ago when gas was close to $4 a gallon. I could get alcohol free gas but had to buy premium which was about $0.24 a gallon higher. However the measured increase in fuel mileage more than offset the price increase. I ran this experiment for about four months through the summer that year. Since I had measured data for E10, it made the comparison fairly easy.
            Save the wave.

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            • #21
              There's a long read here from Consumer Reports that ran tests in 2011. Of course the motivation was greater in the past when we were running out of oil, and North America was importing a lot. With fracking and Canadian production, we are awash with the stuff. Plus demand will start to decline as EV's come into play. Especially in Europe.

              FFVs use special fuel tanks, lines, and pumps designed to be more corrosion resistant. Their emissions systems are also specially designed to recognize and compensate for higher blends of ethanol. Making cars E85-compatible costs automakers about $200 per car, according to some estimates.
              https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/...bate/index.htm

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