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Run Flat- Customer had flat, asked if run flats can be repaired. Here's the answer

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  • Run Flat- Customer had flat, asked if run flats can be repaired. Here's the answer

    Seems every manufacturer has a different opinion or recommendation.


    https://www.fleetfinancials.com/3213...w5eDJE7Q54cJDc

  • #2
    Thanks for the read. Seems like there are differences in opinion and different circumstances. I personally dislike runflats. They have quite a ride hinderance. Better to carry a plug kit, needle nose pliers, small spray bottle with a little dishsoap in it for locating the leak and a good 12 volt air compressor.
    Rocket City Florida

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    • #3
      I was told they can be repaired one time.
      Zeus Bronze HTC, 3LT, Natural Dipped, Q8T Spectra Gray Trident Wheels, NPP Performance Exhaust, ZYC Carbon Flash Exterior Mirrors, DRG Carbon Fiber Interior Trim, E60 Adjustable Front Lift, D84 Carbon Flash Convertible Top and Nacelles, and R8C Museum Delivery

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Vetter1 View Post
        I was told they can be repaired one time.
        How would the tire know or care if it was plugged twice?
        Torch red 1LT, no options. Built June 4, received July 2

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        • #5
          Originally posted by WillRockwell View Post

          How would the tire know or care if it was plugged twice?
          I think the issue is, when you drive on a run flat at zero air pressure, the tire structure itself may be weakened. If you repair that tire after one zero pressure drive, it still has enough integrity to be reused. But a second drive on the same tire with zero pressure, more weakening occurs, and the tire has had it.

          Apparently Pirelli recommends that you dispose of the tire after one run flat drive, and don't trust it any further.

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          • #6
            A good read:

            https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiret...jsp?techid=226

            However, doesn’t note distinction in repairability issue with regard to puncture in sidewall v. Tread area. discuss
            Shadow Gray Metallic; 1LT with Z51, FE4, Comp seats, blk int and package with PDR.

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            • #7
              I quite often top off a tire after discovering a slow leak caused by a nail in the tire, then drive to my tire guy to get it plugged. I cant imagine dropping $500 for a new tire every time I pick up a nail.
              and by the way, what is the chance of finding a tire for this car far from home? What is even the chance of finding any tire that will fit the wheel? If you did find a tire, you would likely be spending $600 for something that you would take off as soon as you got home, because it doesn't match any of the others.
              Last edited by WillRockwell; 06-28-2020, 06:42 AM.
              Torch red 1LT, no options. Built June 4, received July 2

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Frenzy36 View Post
                Thanks for the read. Seems like there are differences in opinion and different circumstances. I personally dislike runflats. They have quite a ride hinderance. Better to carry a plug kit, needle nose pliers, small spray bottle with a little dishsoap in it for locating the leak and a good 12 volt air compressor.
                I agree with Frenzy about not liking run flats and would add price to the equation. That being said I prefer to have run flats for the simple reason that if I do get a flat I can choose the location of where to address the issue-simply a comforting safety factor in an uncertain world-especially if my wife or other family member is driving alone. I always carry a patch kit and compressor for my run flats and have repaired them without issue in the past-but I immediately addressed the loss of pressure and did not keep driving more than the bare minimum. Most tire places won’t repair a run flat, but a regular mechanic might-simple business practice

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                • #9
                  One of the forum members, Morgan Crosbie a Chevy Dealer in Canada, just posted his run flat getting a nail in it and the tire expert said it was repairable. Here's the video.

                  https://youtu.be/I15Rxxpne18

                  I guess it depends on where the puncture is.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by vossenator View Post
                    Seems every manufacturer has a different opinion or recommendation.


                    https://www.fleetfinancials.com/3213...w5eDJE7Q54cJDc
                    Thank you for the very informative article!

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                    • #11
                      The runflats on the C7 (and I assume the C8) don't exact nearly the ride quality penalty that older run flats did. As someone who takes trips in my Corvette, I think the added security of the run flat is well worth it. I do carry a plug kit and a slime kit, but the runflats provide extra opportunity to drive to a safe place before trying to repair a leak, and also a lifeline if the hole is too big to repair. I'd hate to be trying to repair a driver side puncture on the side of a busy highway, or spend hours waiting for a tow truck because there's a 3 inch long gash in my tire that can't be repaired. Or really stuck because I'm in the middle of nowhere with no cell signal to even try to get a tow truck.
                      SunKissed, my 2015 2LT, 7MT, Black over Daytona Sunrise Orange Metallic, Stingray convertible (One of about 40)

                      Purchased 5/2/2015,
                      >36,000 miles

                      Proud member of the Old Dominion Corvette Club. Check us out http://www.olddominioncorvetteclub.org

                      Never grow up - It's a trap.

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                      • #12
                        That's what OnStar is for. No loss of signal unless blocked by tall building.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by meyerweb View Post
                          The runflats on the C7 (and I assume the C8) don't exact nearly the ride quality penalty that older run flats did.
                          In one of the tech presentations, Tadge said that the C8 runflats had better ride quality than the C7 because only the inner sidewall was built to be stiffer, not both. No specific mention if that change compromised the runflat function, but I assume they're still good enough for the old "50 at 50" rule of thumb.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Milliwatt Rob View Post
                            I think the issue is, when you drive on a run flat at zero air pressure, the tire structure itself may be weakened. If you repair that tire after one zero pressure drive, it still has enough integrity to be reused. But a second drive on the same tire with zero pressure, more weakening occurs, and the tire has had it.
                            What if one person has a flat and drives 20 miles on the run flat before getting it fixed. And another person drives 10 miles before getting it fixed, then gets another flat sometime down the road and fixes it after 10 miles. Both tires have been driven 20 miles with zero pressure - which one has weakened more?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by shiumai View Post

                              What if one person has a flat and drives 20 miles on the run flat before getting it fixed. And another person drives 10 miles before getting it fixed, then gets another flat sometime down the road and fixes it after 10 miles. Both tires have been driven 20 miles with zero pressure - which one has weakened more?
                              The more you drive it with zero pressure, the more damaged it is likely to get. So in either instance, don't think that the tire continues to be safe for high performance driving.

                              The damage to the lire, under the circumstances you cite, is likely to be the same. But tire manufacturers have to provide direction that consumers will understand. Which is likely why most manufacturers, such as Pirelli, recommend that the tire be "retired" after one zero pressure use.

                              Can you imagine someone taking a run flat tire, run at zero pressure for 30 miles, having it plugged, and then go tracking with it?

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