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Left Foot Braking

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  • Left Foot Braking

    I have only used my left foot for standing on the dead peddle or the clutch. So I have no touch with this weapon. I have been trying to get used to it lately, and it is very easy to stomp the brakes when I only want a lighter touch. Have seen some stuff about using some braking while being on the throttle in performance driving. I guess I will have to keep trying or just stick to cruising...
    2020 Convertible, Torch Red, 2LT, NPP, Natural, GT1, E60, Q8Q, perpetual status 3000

  • #2
    Originally posted by 68roadster View Post
    I have only used my left foot for standing on the dead peddle or the clutch. So I have no touch with this weapon. I have been trying to get used to it lately, and it is very easy to stomp the brakes when I only want a lighter touch. Have seen some stuff about using some braking while being on the throttle in performance driving. I guess I will have to keep trying or just stick to cruising...
    Dead petals are used to help support the driver. Left foot trail braking into corners is a standard technique in racing. Heel and toe allows for rev matching durning downshifts ( although active rev matching have make this skill redundant ) In road racing, your feet play a huge part of car control and when done correctly, it’s a real tap dance.
    3LT Long Beach Red , Z51, FE4 , ZZ3, Black interior ,38S red stitching, Q8T, FA5, ER1, CFX, and R8C

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    • #3
      I was surprised that there is a dead pedal. That seemed to indicate to me that there would be a clutch at one point. Cars without manual options don't have dead pedals as far as I know.
      Murray - Uxbridge, Ontario, Canada
      2020 Torch red Stingray coupe, Adrenaline red 2LT Q8Q E60 NPP
      Deposit: July 30/19, 1100: Sept 15/19, 3000: Feb 14/20, TPW WAS May 18, August 24 and lastly July 27,
      3300: July 15, 3400: July 22, 3800: July 30, 4200: Aug 06, 5000: Aug 7, 6000: Aug 12!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by 68roadster View Post
        I have only used my left foot for standing on the dead peddle or the clutch. So I have no touch with this weapon. I have been trying to get used to it lately, and it is very easy to stomp the brakes when I only want a lighter touch. Have seen some stuff about using some braking while being on the throttle in performance driving. I guess I will have to keep trying or just stick to cruising...

        Sounds like heel/toe style to me too.
        I had not thought of it, dead pedal is right there on the Boss. (LS)
        Last edited by LSECO; 01-08-2020, 12:43 PM.
        C8er

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Murray20c8 View Post
          I was surprised that there is a dead pedal. That seemed to indicate to me that there would be a clutch at one point. Cars without manual options don't have dead pedals as far as I know.
          Dead pedal gives you some place to support your left foot and leg, especially during spirited driving. All C7s with the auto still have a dead pedal. Will be useful if you are using left foot braking, too.
          SunKissed, my 2015 2LT, 7MT, Black over Daytona Sunrise Orange Metallic, Stingray convertible (One of about 40)

          Purchased 5/2/2015,
          >36,000 miles

          Proud member of the Old Dominion Corvette Club. Check us out http://www.olddominioncorvetteclub.org

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          • #6
            Yes, but they had a stick option. One of my Camaro's was an auto and it had a dead pedal as does my Camaro M6. There are other cars that one can be spirited in without a dead pedal. Meep Meep!
            Murray - Uxbridge, Ontario, Canada
            2020 Torch red Stingray coupe, Adrenaline red 2LT Q8Q E60 NPP
            Deposit: July 30/19, 1100: Sept 15/19, 3000: Feb 14/20, TPW WAS May 18, August 24 and lastly July 27,
            3300: July 15, 3400: July 22, 3800: July 30, 4200: Aug 06, 5000: Aug 7, 6000: Aug 12!

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            • #7
              My prius has a dead pedal. I haven't been able to push that car enough to need it though

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              • #8
                My Volt has a dead pedal.

                I also notice that many people who use their left foot for braking rest their foot on the pedal enough to engage their brake lights, very annoying as well as unsafe. IMO left foot is only for a clutch pedal or dead pedal, exception would be trail braking on a track I suppose but I have very limited track experience and have never tried it.

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                • #9
                  Police training includes left foot braking because you have much faster reaction times for braking and you can get on the gas again immediately.
                  Can also be beneficial in traffic with getting cut off, wildlife aviodance on highways, etc.
                  Done properly, you do not ride the brakes.
                  TPW March 2. 3LT, Z51, FE4, Black GBA, ZZ3, Black interior with Red seats/red stitch HU0 & 2 tone TU7, E60, J6N, RIK, Q8Q, etc.
                  Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada

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                  • #10
                    Police training includes left foot braking because you have much faster reaction times for braking and you can get on the gas again immediately.
                    Can also be beneficial in traffic with getting cut off, wildlife avoidance on highways, etc.
                    Done properly, you do not ride the brakes.
                    I've been a left foot braker for many years with my automatic cars for the reasons quoted above. When my right leg was in a cast, the habit made transitioning to driving with the left foot easier.

                    Dead pedal: My Jeep Cherokee has a dead pedal, and there hasn't been a manual available for years. Unfortunately, Jeep chose to carpet the pedal, and the WeatherTech mats only covered half way up, a failure on their part.
                    C8 Coupe, Zeus Bronze, 3LT, TU7, HUE, GUI, CF7, EFY, EYK, J6N, NPP, E60, STI, VQK

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                    • #11
                      I feel like OP is referring to launch control. Other than launching for fun there is no valid reason to left foot brake on street.

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                      • #12
                        I have used the trailing brake technique more on my motorcycle than on my cars. Mostly due to more aggressive cornering.
                        I do burn up my rear pads at a much higher rate (almost 3 to 1 vs front brakes).
                        In the car a generally use the transmission more in cornering.
                        Not saying it is the right way, but it works for me.
                        B&B

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                        • #13
                          “It is amazing how many drivers, even at the Formula One Level, think that the brakes are for slowing the car down.”

                          - Mario Andretti


                          Use what ever foot you can
                          2020 Stingray Triple Blue Coupe “Cindyblue”
                          6000: status : R8C on August 5,2020 @10:00 🥳🍾
                          2020 C8 Stingray; 3LT ; GS7 Elkhart Lake Blue ; HTO Twilight/Tension interior; Z51;FE4 Mag Ride; C2Q dual roof ; FA5 interior vis CF; ZZ3 engine appearance; Q8T Spectra Gray Tridents; RCC; J6E yellow Calipers; VQK Splash Guards; EYK Chrome Exterior Badge package; R8C
                          2014 Stingray Laguna Blue : SOLD

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                          • #14
                            Never brake in the turn. Always brake/downshift before entering the turn , accelerating at the apex . Works for me. Learned at my first HPDE -an Audi event years ago.
                            C8er

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                            • #15
                              Left foot braking is a very useful tool on the racetrack. I left foot brake on the street only out of habit from years of left foot braking on the racetrack. It definitely eats up brakes and rotors more quickly.

                              On the track, it allows you to lift off the gas later on approach, and brake deeper into the corner as you transition to throttle. There is a definite overlap between left foot trail braking and throttle-on application. The key is that you can control the weight transfer into and through the corner apex. This allows one to control transient mid-corner understeer/oversteer and car rotation at the apex. One of the coolest effects once you get good, is that in the rain you can "pedal" the car through the corner and control oversteer/understeer through a significant portion of lower speed corners - again its all about controlling weight transfer and therefore traction.

                              I think the best and most visible demonstration of similar traction control was by Mick Doohan in MotoGP and his ability to rotate the bike using his rear brake. To be effective in a formula car with a dog ring gearbox, you do have to learn to upshift and downshift with no clutch.

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