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GM IS Radically Changing! C8.R Sebring Night Testing! FVS’ Latest Interior Rendering.

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New C8 ME Proposals By “unlimitedPower”! FVS’ Latest Interior Render! Bdsvavars ME GIF Video Rendering!

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Buying Your C8 Nationally Or Locally? Contrasting C8 Scoop Trim? duckvett’s Photo of the Day Winner

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Buying Your C8 Nationally? Contrasting C8 Scoop Trim? MikeC8 Wins Today’s “Photo of the Day Award”

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MECF Forum “Picture of the Day Award” (POTD) Section Started; To Be Eligible, Post Your Picture in our C1-6 or C7 section.

A different admin/mod chosen photo(s) each day, one you earlier placed of your car it in the C1-C6 Fantastic Corvettes section, the Compelling C7 section (or be admin/mod ME section chosen). We today feature Steven Bell’s beauty: https://www.midenginecorvetteforum.c...y-award-winner
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Video of ME at Nurburgring

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  • #31
    That is my preferred wheel at this time, but I know I am not alone in wanting a third option to select from.
    Excited owners of a 2015 Z06. Lifetime, annual contributors, and 20 year members of NCM. A 2020 ME Corvette is coming next.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by John View Post
      As Fasttoys posted close to a year ago, expect the Porsche model for an option list, e.g., very long and not inexpensive ones. Hope Sparco or Recaro are an option for those who want!
      Having had 2 Cadillac CTS-V.s I actually did not like the Recaro Seats in the 1 and sold it. After driving a couple of hours I found them extremely uncomfortable compared to the stock leather seats. The stock seats have plenty of bolster support and lumbar as well.
      Rocket City Florida

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      • #33
        I personally agree and will not buy them, but for those who wish, it would be a nice option. I like my GT seats; like the C7’s comp seats too.
        Excited owners of a 2015 Z06. Lifetime, annual contributors, and 20 year members of NCM. A 2020 ME Corvette is coming next.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Bikerjulio View Post


          Firstly it's been widely reported that GM has worked with Tremec (the current MT supplier) on a version of their DCT for the C8 Corvette.

          Secondly, I have a modern DCT car ('18 Golf R) and have listened to every video out there, and without a doubt it's a DCT. There's a dead giveaway in one video as the car comes to a stop you can hear a rev-matched down shift to first. Conventional autos don't do that.
          I hope you're right and I'm more curious because I've never driven a DCT car, but the downshift at around the 2:21 mark kind of sounded like that coming from an automatic gearbox. The upshift 2 seconds later sounded phenomenal but that downshift has me worried it's an auto, as I really hope they offer the DCT especially if the clutch pedal will no longer be an option.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Daviboss10 View Post

            No its Sparco, which doesnt make much difference since its still a racing seat company... Maybe its an option. But i thkink it doesnt matter to much, the things that they are testing there aren't really affected by the seats, and it is the worlds most dangerous race track so i guess they decided to go with them.
            Definitely Sparco, but I think it's GM policy (or at least it used to be) to install racing seats and a roll cage in any of their track-tested cars. Another possibility is the drivers are using the racing seats to get better feedback from the chassis to fine-tune the suspension.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by NewYuriCity View Post

              I hope you're right and I'm more curious because I've never driven a DCT car, but the downshift at around the 2:21 mark kind of sounded like that coming from an automatic gearbox. The upshift 2 seconds later sounded phenomenal but that downshift has me worried it's an auto, as I really hope they offer the DCT especially if the clutch pedal will no longer be an option.
              It’s a DCT you can tell from the loud fart as we call it on up shifts. I have owned so many DCT/PDK I cant count.
              Because of packaging DCT is the better option over a starndard automatic on an ME. I asked this before any mid engine cars being built today with an automatic transmission? Other than the Lotus EVORA?
              sourcing a supplier would not be easy with automatic and more pricy verses using current DCT supply that is modded to fit your packaging.

              https://www.caranddriver.com/news/fr...al-new-details

              In today’s C&D post above Paddle shifters will be mounted either to the wheel itself or to the steering column, as we believe the mid-engined monster will come exclusively with a Tremec-developed eight-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission.
              Last edited by Fasttoys; 09-06-2018, 05:44 PM.

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              • #37
                I can never read these C&D articles bcs they aren't available in my region. Disadvantages of living on the opposite side of the pond I guess...

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                • #38
                  David, The video in that article is the identical one as here:



                  And here is 90+% of the content in that article:

                  Originally posted by Car&Driver
                  Call us Captain Ahab, because the upcoming mid-engined Corvette is our great white whale. Each passing day sees us get closer to laying eye***** on the finished beast, and these images mark some of our best views yet of what to expect from the C8-generation Vette.

                  Although the car remains cloaked in camouflage, a number of new details about the latest iteration of the American sports car can now be confirmed. Notably, the fast rear glass that marks today's Corvette isn't carried over to this eighth-generation test car. Despite the McLaren 570S–like rear end of the car photographed above, sources tell us that the production car will likely be equipped with a fastback-style glass rear-window panel that's designed to show off the next Vette's mid-mounted engine. What appears to be a camera mounted at the rear of the roof ought to help mitigate the C8's limited rear visibility.

                  As in today's Corvette, it seems the new model will sport a removable roof panel, as evidenced by what appears to be a cutline just aft of the windshield header; it's possible this will be stowable in the nose of the car. Inside, the driver will be greeted by a
                  "squircle"-shaped steering wheel with a flattened top and a flattened bottom. Paddle shifters will be mounted either to the wheel itself or to the steering column, as we believe the mid-engined monster will come exclusively with a Tremec-developed eight-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission.
                  Last edited by John; 09-06-2018, 06:23 PM.
                  Excited owners of a 2015 Z06. Lifetime, annual contributors, and 20 year members of NCM. A 2020 ME Corvette is coming next.

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                  • #39
                    Thanks john

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Fasttoys View Post

                      It’s a DCT you can tell from the loud fart as we call it on up shifts. I have owned so many DCT/PDK I cant count.
                      Because of packaging DCT is the better option over a starndard automatic on an ME. I asked this before any mid engine cars being built today with an automatic transmission? Other than the Lotus EVORA?
                      sourcing a supplier would not be easy with automatic and more pricy verses using current DCT supply that is modded to fit your packaging.

                      https://www.caranddriver.com/news/fr...al-new-details

                      In today’s C&D post above Paddle shifters will be mounted either to the wheel itself or to the steering column, as we believe the mid-engined monster will come exclusively with a Tremec-developed eight-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission.
                      I only have one experience with paddleshift DCT, and the paddles move with the wheel. So if I move my hand on the wheel I loose the paddle.

                      If it was a really fast steering ratio like a race car that would be OK, but I'm thinking I'd prefer fixed paddles with long arms.

                      What's your opinion?

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Bikerjulio View Post

                        I only have one experience with paddleshift DCT, and the paddles move with the wheel. So if I move my hand on the wheel I loose the paddle.

                        If it was a really fast steering ratio like a race car that would be OK, but I'm thinking I'd prefer fixed paddles with long arms.

                        What's your opinion?
                        Most of the Italians cars like Ferrari, Lamborghini have them mounted to the steering column, with extra long paddles. The Germans mount them to the steering wheel similar placement as the C7. Personally, I prefer the column-mounted ones because you always know exactly where your paddle-shifters are and it's much easier to select a gear while cornering.


                        Article from magazine.
                        What Maxy is asking here is: Where should paddle shifters be mounted on a car? Or, more appropriately: Do I (Doug DeMuro) agree with Maxy that paddle shifters should be mounted on the steering column rather than the wheel?

                        The answer to this question, Maxy, is that you're right. You don't need to pursuede me, buddy!

                        Here's an overview of the situation as I see it. Right now, there are two types of paddle shifters -- paddles on the wheel, or paddles on the steering column. The vast majority of street cars with paddle shifters stick them on the steering wheel, while virtually every race car with paddle shifters has them mounted on the steering column.

                        To me, and to everyone who's serious about driving, the race cars have it right. Here's why: When you're in a tremendously tight corner, and you've gone hand-over-hand on the steering wheel, meaning that you no longer really know exactly what part of the wheel is "up," you don't want there to be any ambiguity at all about where you can shift gears. So if you're in a tight corner, and you're slowing down from 200 miles per hour, and your steering wheel is inverted as you negotiate the bend, you don't want to have to look down and figure out where your downshift paddle has gone. You want that thing sitting there, precisely where you'd expect it, precisely where it always is, on the same side of the steering wheel.

                        The alternative is tremendously annoying: While you're turning, while you're braking, while you're finding the right racing line, you have to also be thinking about the direction of the steering wheel, in case you need to fire off a downshift. It's bad design for anyone who's really serious about driving on the track.

                        And so, race cars do it right: In a world where hundredths of a second count, race car designers take great effort to ensure they have no disadvantages. Race cars mount their paddle shifters on the column, and they sit there, bolted down, unmoving throughout the race.

                        But it isn't quite as easy in road cars. You see, race cars don't have column-mounted stalks for the turn signals or windshield wipers. Instead, virtually everything in most modern race cars is controlled solely from the steering wheel itself, leaving race car steering columns freed up to contain the paddle shifters.

                        But road cars do have stalks -- for the turn signals, the wipers, the cruise control and sometimes even the transmission. And if a car manufacturer started bolting the shift paddles to the steering column, it would have to redesign a car's column-mounted stalks to be longer, and to have strange angles, so they could still integrate these things easily around the paddle shifters. Naturally, carmakers don't want to do this because it adds cost and complexity, and so most cars have steering wheel-mounted paddles.

                        However, Maxy, they probably shouldn't. For a serious car, with serious driving capabilities, intended to be used on the track, the paddles should stay still when the steering wheel turns. With that said, most of us don't drive on the track, so most of us don't really care -- and this isn't a topic that earns a lot of complaints. Nonetheless, I hope I've successfully pursueded your friends.
                        Last edited by Fasttoys; 09-06-2018, 09:34 PM.

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                        • #42
                          That's exactly my experience with shifters on the wheel. And I see the problem with road cars and column mount.

                          And obviously why Ferrari are mounting everything they can on the wheel, like turn signals, wipers etc. Why not? Especially if it allows column mounted paddles. Wonder what the C8 has.

                          Looking at this photo I've got to think it's paddles on wheel, otherwise a paddle would be visible here instead of a wiper stalk.

                          Last edited by Bikerjulio; 09-07-2018, 04:40 AM.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Bikerjulio View Post
                            That's exactly my experience with shifters on the wheel. And I see the problem with road cars and column mount.

                            And obviously why Ferrari are mounting everything they can on the wheel, like turn signals, wipers etc. Why not? Especially if it allows column mounted paddles. Wonder what the C8 has.

                            Looking at this photo I've got to think it's paddles on wheel, otherwise a paddle would be visible here instead of a wiper stalk.

                            If you look closely you can see a reflective mettalic surface lurking behind the wheel. I assume that should be the paddle, but since you dont see anything coming from the steering collum connecting to it, its propably mounted on the wheel.

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                            • #44
                              Hi guys! On a trip around Eastern Europe, poor internet connection, and all hell breaks loose! Loving what I see. 😎
                              Regarding the shift paddles, I have had both, and much prefer large paddles mounted to the steering column.
                              Acording to a post by Zerv 2 on the other forum they are in fact column mounted. 👍

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                              • #45
                                Thank you 91ZR1! We saw a poorly quality interior picture, brought to our attention by Fasttoys, that could support that.

                                Click image for larger version  Name:	D7764A82-B73B-4C04-935C-9BA4AC895C39.jpeg Views:	2 Size:	547.0 KB ID:	8064
                                Excited owners of a 2015 Z06. Lifetime, annual contributors, and 20 year members of NCM. A 2020 ME Corvette is coming next.

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